Etymology
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rhino- 

before vowels rhin-, word-forming element of Greek origin meaning "nose, of the nose," from Greek rhino-, combining form of rhis "nose," which is of uncertain origin.

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rhinoplasty (n.)

"plastic surgery of the nose," 1828, from rhino- "nose" + -plasty. Related: rhinoplastic (1823).

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nasology (n.)

"the study of the nose or noses," 1826, from naso- "relating to the nose" + -ology. Related: Nasologist; nasological.

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nasal (adj.)

early 15c., nasale, "of or pertaining to the nose or nostrils," from Medieval Latin, from Latin nasus "nose, the nose, sense of smell," from PIE root *nas- "nose."

Of speech sounds, "uttered with resonance in the nose," attested from 1660s. As a noun, "letter or sound uttered through or partly through the nose," from 1660s. Earlier noun senses were "medicinal fluid for the nose" (early 15c.) and "part of a helmet which protects the nose and adjacent parts" (nasel, c. 1300). Related: Nasalization.

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snite (v.)

"to blow or wipe the nose," c. 1100, now Scottish and dialectal, from Old English snytan, related to Old Norse snyta, Middle Dutch snuten, Old High German snuzen, German schneuzen "to blow one's nose," and to snot. Nose-sniting "blowing of the nose" is attested from early 15c.

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rhinitis (n.)

"inflammation of the nose," especially the mucous membrane, 1829, medical Latin, from rhino- "nose" + -itis "inflammation."

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rhinology (n.)

"sum of scientific knowledge concerning the nose" [Century Dictionary]; by 1838, but as "science of divining characters by the dimensions of the nose," from rhino- "nose" + -logy "study of." As a branch of medicine concerned with nasal and sinus problems, by 1874. Related: Rhinological; rhinologist.

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snitch (n.)
"informer," 1785, probably from underworld slang meaning "the nose" (1700), which apparently developed from an earlier meaning "fillip on the nose" (1670s). Snitcher in same sense is from 1827.
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rhinorrhea (n.)

"mucous discharge from the nose," 1851, also rhinorrhoea, from rhino- "nose" + Greek rhoia "flow" (from PIE root *sreu- "to flow"). Attested in the 1840s in German, Italian, and French. Related: Rhinorhheal.

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sniffer (n.)
"the nose," 1858, agent noun from sniff (v.).
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