Etymology
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extra-curricular (adj.)

also extracurricular, in reference to education, "pursued in addition to the normal course of study," 1911, from extra- + curricular. As a noun, "an extra-curricular course or activity," by 1957.

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sack (n.4)

"sherry," 1530s, an alteration of French (vin) sec "dry (wine)," from Latin siccus "dry" (see siccative). Originally of strong, light-colored wine from Spain and the Canaries. OED notes that the vowel is "not a normal development from the original 'seck.' "

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exorbitance (n.)

mid-15c., exorbitaunce, "a deviation from what is right, a transgression of normal limitations" (a sense now archaic or obsolete), from exorbitant + -ance. Sense of "extravagance in degree or amount, excessiveness" is from 1640s. Related: Exorbitancy.

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tidewater (n.)
also tide-water, 1772, "water affected by the normal ebb and flow of the tide," from tide (n.) + water (n.1). In reference to the lowland regions of the Virginia shore of the western Chesapeake Bay, 1832.
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deviant (adj.)

c. 1400, deviaunt, "different, deviating, straying, wandering," from Late Latin deviantem (nominative devians), present participle of deviare "turn aside," from Latin phrase de via, from de "off" (see de-) + via "way" (see via). The noun meaning "one that deviates, one who goes astray" is from 1540s. It is attested by 1927 as "something that deviates from normal." In the sexual sense "person whose sexuality deviates from what is held to be normal," from 1952. Also compare deviate (n.), recorded in that sense since 1912.

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oncogene (n.)

"gene which can transform a normal cell into a tumor cell," 1969, from onco- "tumor" + -gene, from root of Greek gignere (perfective genui) "to beget, produce" (from PIE root *gene- "give birth, beget"). Related: Oncogenesis "formation or production of tumors" (1932); oncogenic (1949).

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decompress (v.)

"relieve or reduce pressure," by 1866, from de- + compress (v.). In early use especially "restore gradually to normal conditions  of air pressure." Figurative sense "become calm, relax" is by 1964. Related: Decompressed; decompressing.

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ordinate (adj.)

late 14c., "regular, normal," of behavior, thoughts, etc., "properly directed, proper," from Latin ordinatus, past participle of ordinare "arrange, set in order," from ordo (genitive ordinis) "row, rank, series, arrangement" (see order (n.)). Related: Ordinately.

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kabuki (n.)

1896, from Japanese, popular theater (as opposed to shadow puppet-plays or lyrical Noh dramas).

Kabuki comes from the verb 'kabuku', meaning 'to deviate from the normal manners and customs, to do something absurd.' Today kabuki is performed only by men, but the first kabuki performance was given in about 1603 by a girl, a shrine maiden of Kyoto named O-kuni, who 'deviated from the normal customs' by dressing as a man and entertaining the public with satirical dances in the grounds of the Kitano shrine. [Toshie M. Evans, "A Dictionary of Japanese Loanwords," 1997]

Alternative etymology [Barnhart, OED] is that it means literally "art of song and dance," from ka "song" + bu "dance" + ki "art, skill."

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pyrexia (n.)

"fever, a higher bodily temperature than is normal," 1769, medical Latin, from Greek pyrexis "feverishness," from pyressein "to be feverish, to be ill of fever," from pyretos "fever, burning heat" (related to pyr "fire," from PIE root *paewr- "fire") + abstract noun ending -ia. Formerly sometimes nativized as pyrexy. Related: Pyrexial; pyrexic; pyrexical.

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