Etymology
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fecundity (n.)
early 15c., from Latin fecunditatem (nominative fecunditas) "fruitfulness, fertility," from fecundus "fruitful, fertile" (see fecund).
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adulterant (n.)
"that which adulterates," 1735, from Latin adulterantem (nominative adulterans), present participle of adulterare (see adulteration).
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benevolent (adj.)

mid-15c., "wishing to do good, well-disposed, kindly," from Old French benivolent and directly from Latin benevolentem (nominative benevolens) "wishing (someone) well, benevolent," related to benevolentia "good feeling," from bene "well" (see bene-) + volentem (nominative volens) present participle of velle "to wish" (see will (v.)). Related: Benevolently.

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seclusion (n.)
1610s, from Medieval Latin seclusionem (nominative seclusio), noun of action from past participle stem of Latin secludere (see seclude).
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impendent (adj.)
1590s, from Latin impendentem (nominative impendens) "impending," present participle of impendere "to hang over" (see impend). Related: Impendence.
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stolidity (n.)

1560s, from French stolidite and directly from Late Latin stoliditatem (nominative stoliditas) "dullness, obtuseness, stupidity," from Latin stolidus (see stolid).

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superscription (n.)
late 14c., from Latin superscriptionem (nominative superscriptio) "a writing above," noun of action from past participle stem of superscribere (see superscript).
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trituration (n.)
1640s, from Late Latin triturationem (nominative trituratio), noun of action from past participle stem of Latin triturare "to grind" (see triturate).
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vilification (n.)
1620s, from Medieval Latin vilificationem (nominative vilificatio), noun of action from past participle stem of Late Latin vilificare (see vilify).
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satiety (n.)

1530s, from French satiété, from Latin satietatem (nominative satietas) "abundance, sufficiency, fullness," from satis "enough," from PIE root *sa- "to satisfy."

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