Etymology
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nightgown (n.)

also night-gown, "loose gown for putting on at night," c. 1400, from night + gown.

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nightfall (n.)

"the coming on of night," 1700; see night + fall (n.).

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nycthemeron (n.)

"the whole natural day, a day and a night, twenty-four hours," 1680s, from Greek nykhthēmeron "a day and a night," from nykt-, a combining form of nyx "night" (see night) + hēmera "day," from PIE *Hehmer "day."

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nightstick (n.)

also night-stick, "policeman's or watchman's truncheon," 1880, from night + stick (n.). So called because it was carried on night patrols.

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all-nighter (n.)

"incident of staying up all night," 1870, from the adverbial phrase; see all + night. By 1930 as "person who stays up all night."

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overnight (adv.)

c. 1300, "at night, at evening, through or during the night," from over- + night (n.). Originally especially "during the night just passed." The meaning "in the course of a single night, hence seemingly instantaneously" is attested from 1939. As a noun, "a stop lasting one night," by 1959. As a verb, "to pass the night," by 1891.

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eyesight (n.)

"sense of sight, capacity for seeing," c. 1200, from eye (n.) + sight (n.).

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nightlong (adj.)

"for the period of a night," Middle English nightlonge, from Old English nihtlang; see night + -long.

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nightclub (n.)

also night-club, "club open at night," 1894, from night + club (n.) in the social sense.

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nightly (adj.)

Middle English nightli, from Old English nihtlic "nocturnal, at night, occurring during or characteristic of the night;" see night + -ly (1). As an adverb, "every night," Middle English nihtlich (mid-15c.), from the adjective.

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