Etymology
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transcendentalism (n.)

1803, in reference to Kant, later to Schelling; 1842 in reference to the New England religio-philosophical movement among American followers of German writers; from transcendental + -ism.

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congregational (adj.)

1630s, "of or pertaining to a congregation," from congregation + -al (1). In reference to Congregationalism, the Protestant movement in which church congregations were self-governing, from 1640s. The term was most used in New England, in Britain they were called Independent.

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mobility (n.)

early 15c., "capacity for motion, ability to move or be moved, property of being easily movable," from Old French mobilité "changeableness, inconsistency, fickleness" and directly from Latin mobilitatem (nominative mobilitas) "activity, speed," figuratively "changeableness, fickleness, inconstancy," from mobilis "movable, easy to move" (see mobile (adj.)). Socio-economics sense of "possibility of movement between different social levels" is from 1900 in sociology writing.

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theorist (n.)

"one given to theory and speculation," 1590s; see theory + -ist.

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communism (n.)

1843, "social system based on collective ownership," from French communisme (c. 1840), from commun (Old French comun "common, general, free, open, public;" see common (adj.)) + -isme (see -ism).

Originally a theory of society. As the name of a political or economic  theory which rests upon the abolition of the right of private property, especially the means of production and distribution, and seeks the overthrow of capitalism by revolutions, it is attested from 1850, a translation of German Kommunismus (itself from French), in Marx and Engels' "Manifesto of the Communist Party." Compare communist

By 1919 and through mid-20c. it was a general a term of abuse for revolutionaries, implying anti-social criminality without regard to political theory.

Each [i.e. socialism, communism, anarchism] stands for a state of things, or a striving after it, that differs much from that which we know; & for many of us, especially those who are comfortably at home in the world as it is, they have consequently come to be the positive, comparative, & superlative, distinguished not in kind but in degree only, of the terms of abuse applicable to those who would disturb our peace. [Fowler]
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psychosocial (adj.)

also psycho-social, "pertaining to or involving the influence of social factors on a person's mind or behavior," 1891, from psycho- + social (adj.).

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asocial (adj.)

1883, "antagonistic to society or social order," from a- (3) "not" + social (adj.); also compare antisocial.

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antisocial (adj.)

also anti-social, "unsocial, averse to social intercourse," 1797, from anti- + social (adj.). The meaning "hostile to social order or norms" is from 1802. Other, older words in the "disinclined to or unsuited for society" sense include dissocial (1762), dissociable (c. 1600).

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theoretical (adj.)

1610s, "contemplative," with -al (1) + Late Latin theoreticus "of or pertaining to theory," from Greek theoretikos "contemplative, speculative, pertaining to theory" (by Aristotle contrasted to praktikos), from theoretos "that may be seen or considered," from theorein "to consider, look at" (see theory). Meaning "pertaining to theory, making deductions from theory not from fact" (opposed to practical) is from 1650s; earlier in this sense was theorical (c. 1500). Meaning "ideal, hypothetical" is from 1790s (implied in theoretically). Related: theoretician.

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hafla (n.)

in reference to belly-dance performance and social gathering, by 1998, from Arabic hafla "party, social or family gathering."

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