Etymology
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nor (conj.)

"and not," mid-13c., from ne (adv.) "no" + or (conj.), or else a contraction of Middle English nauther (see neither) and influenced in form by or. Generally correlative to neither or some other negative.

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inhumane (adj.)
originally a variant spelling and pronunciation of inhuman "cruel, hard-hearted;" it appears to have died out 17c. but returned c. 1822, probably a reformation as a negative of humane (q.v.), with its accent.
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con (n.1, adv.)

"negation; in the negative; the arguments, arguers, or voters against a proposal" (mainly in pro and con), 1570s, short for Latin contra "against" (see contra (prep., adv.)). Compare pro (n.2).

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negate (v.)

"deny, make negative or null," 1795 (with an isolated use from 1620s), a back-formation from negation, or else from Latin negatus, past participle of negare, from PIE root *ne- "not." Related: Negated; negates; negating.

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professionalism (n.)

1846, "characteristic ideas or methods of professional persons," from professional (adj.) + -ism. In late 19c., in sports and amusements, sometimes with a negative sense, implying pursuit of some activity so marked as to be objectionable or offensive (1879).

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enlargement (n.)
1530s, "a release from confinement," from enlarge in the secondary Middle English sense "release a prisoner" (mid-15c.) + -ment. Meaning "act of increasing in size" is from 1560s. Photographic sense "picture of a larger size than the negative from which it was made" is from 1866.
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litotes (n.)
rhetorical figure in which an affirmative is expressed by the negative of its contrary ("no laughing matter"), from Greek litotes "plainness, simplicity," from litos "smooth, plain," also "frugal, small, meager," and, of style, "simple, unadorned," from PIE root *(s)lei- "slimy, sticky, slippery" (hence "smooth"); see slime (n.).
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superable (adj.)
"surmountable," 1620s, from Latin superabilis "that may be overcome," from superare "to overcome, surmount, go over, rise above," from super "over" (from PIE root *uper "over") + -abilis (see -able). The negative formation insuperable is older and more common and superable may be a back-formation from it.
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nephalist (n.)

"teetotaler, one who practices or advocates total abstinence from intoxicating drink," 1860, from Late Greek nēphalismos, from nēphalios "sober," from nēphein "be sober," often metaphorical, from IE *(n)egwh-"sober," with negative particle + *hegwh- "drink." Related: Nephalism (1859).

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need (v.)

Old English neodian "be necessary, be required (for some purpose)," intransitive; also transitive, "require, have need of," from the same root as need (n.). Meaning "to be under obligation (to do something)," especially in negative or interrogative sentences implying obligation or necessity, is from late 14c. Related: Needed; needing. The adjectival phrase need-to-know is attested from 1952. Dismissive phrase who needs it?, popular from c. 1960, is a translated Yiddishism.

Need, especially in negative and interrogative sentences implying obligation or necessity, is often used, in the present, before an infinitive, usually without to, need being then invariable (without the personal terminations of the second and third persons singular): as, he or they need not go; need he do it? [Century Dictionary]
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