Etymology
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alongside (adv.)
1707, "parallel to the side of," contraction of the prepositional phrase; see along + side (n.). Originally mostly nautical. As a preposition from 1793.
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hard-up (adj.)
"in difficulties," especially "short of money," 1821, slang; it was earlier a nautical expression, in reference to steering.
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alow (adv.)
"low down," mid-13c.; see a- (1) + low (adj.). Older than below. Nautical use from c. 1500.
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oldster (n.)

"old or oldish person, man past middle life," 1818, colloquial, originally nautical, from old + -ster, on analogy of youngster.

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skivvies (n.)

"underwear," by 1932, nautical slang, of unknown origin. An earlier skivvy/skivey was London slang for "female domestic servant" (1902).

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athwart (adv.)
"crosswise, from side to side," late 15c., from a- (1) + thwart (v.). In nautical use, "across the line of a ship's course."
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fore-and-aft (adj.)
nautical, "stem-to-stern," 1610s; see fore + aft. Especially of sails set on the lengthwise line of the vessel (1820), or of vessels so rigged.
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mainstay (n.)

"chief support," 1787, a figurative use of a nautical noun meaning "stay which extends from the main-top to the foot of the foremast" (late 15c.), from main (adj.) + stay (n.).

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becalm (v.)
1550s in nautical use, "deprive a ship of wind," from be- + calm. Meaning "make calm or still" is from 1610s. Related: Becalmed; becalming.
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deck-hand (n.)

"person regularly employed as a laborer on the deck of a vessel," 1839, American English, from deck (n.) in the nautical sense + hand (n.) "manual worker."

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