Etymology
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seamount (n.)

"large natural elevation rising abruptly from the ocean floor," by 1908, from sea + mount (n.1).

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Perrier 

proprietary name of a natural mineral water from southern France, attested in English by 1904.

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rock-face (n.)

"vertical expanse of natural rock," 1847, from rock (n.1) + face (n.).

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unsophisticated (adj.)
1620s, "unmixed," from un- (1) "not" + sophisticated (adj.). Meaning "ingenuous, natural, inexperienced" is recorded from 1660s.
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oops (interj.)

"a natural exclamation" [OED] of surprise at doing something awkward, attested from 1933 (compare whoops).

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atresia (n.)
"occlusion of a natural passage in the body, absence of a natural opening or passage," 1807, from Modern Latin atresia, from Greek atretos "not perforated," from a- "not, without" (see a- (3)) + tresis "perforation," from PIE root *tere- (1) "to rub, turn," with derivatives referring to boring and drilling. Related: Atresic.
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tut (interj.)
1520s, along with tush (mid-15c.), a natural interjection expressing impatient or dismissive contempt.
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aptly (adv.)
early 15c., "by natural means;" 1540s, "in a suitable manner," from apt + -ly (2).
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physio- 

word-forming element meaning "nature, natural, physical," from Greek physios "nature" (from PIE root *bheue- "to be, exist, grow").

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au naturel (adj.)

1817, "uncooked," French, literally "naturally, in the natural state." Originally in English a term in French recipes, it was used euphemistically in English for "undressed" by 1860, perhaps via its use in French in the visual arts. See au + natural (adj.).

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