Etymology
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maguey (n.)

"agave plant, the American aloe," 1550s, from Spanish, from Taino (Arawakan), a native Haitian language.

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Yakima 

Native American people of Washington State, 1852, perhaps from Sahaptin /iyakima/ "pregnant women."

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Cherokee 

native North American people, also their Iroquoian language, 1670s, Chorakae, from Cherokee tsaragi.

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Tejano 

"native or inhabitant of Texas," 1925, from American Spanish, formerly Texano "a Texan" (see Texas).

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titi (n.)

type of small South American monkey, 1832, from native name in Tupi, probably imitative.

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sora (n.)

small, short-billed North American bird species, the Carolina rail, 1705, probably from a native name.

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Britisher (n.)

"native or inhabitant of Great Britain," 1829, American English, more or less disparaging, from British + -er (1).

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Anglo (n.)

"American, English-speaking white person," 1941, southwestern U.S., from Anglo-American. Anglo was used similarly of native, English-speakers in Canada from 1800 and Britain from 1964.

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Muskogean 

Native American language family of the southeastern U.S., 1890, from Muskogee, name of the Creek and related tribes (1775), from Creek maskoki.

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ani (n.)

black bird of the cuckoo family native to the American tropics, 1829, from Spanish or Portuguese ani, from Tupi.

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