Etymology
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workmanship (n.)
early 14c., "performance of labor," from workman + -ship. Meaning "skill as a workman" is from 1520s.
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instrumentalist (n.)
"musical performer on an instrument," 1818, from instrumental in the musical sense + -ist. Perhaps from German Instrumentalist (18c.).
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keyed (adj.)
1796, "having keys," from key (n.) in the musical sense. Also "to set the tone (of a musical instrument) to a particular key; hence figurative keyed up "excited, high-strung" (1889).
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pitch-pipe (n.)

"small musical pipe by which an instrument may be tuned or the proper pitch of a piece of music given," 1711, from pitch (n.1) in the musical sense + pipe (n.1).

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tune (n.)
early 14c., "a musical sound," unexplained variant of tone (n.). From late 14c. as "a well-rounded succession of musical notes, an air, melody." Meaning "state of being in proper pitch" is from mid-15c.
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theory (n.)

1590s, "conception, mental scheme," from Late Latin theoria (Jerome), from Greek theōria "contemplation, speculation; a looking at, viewing; a sight, show, spectacle, things looked at," from theōrein "to consider, speculate, look at," from theōros "spectator," from thea "a view" (see theater) + horan "to see," which is possibly from PIE root *wer- (3) "to perceive." Philosophy credits sense evolution in the Greek word to Pythagoras.

Earlier in this sense was theorical (n.), late 15c. Sense of "principles or methods of a science or art" (rather than its practice) is first recorded 1610s (as in music theory, which is the science of musical composition, apart from practice or performance). Sense of "an intelligible explanation based on observation and reasoning" is from 1630s.

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residual (n.)

1550s, in mathematics, "a residual quantity," from residual (adj.) or from residue + -al (2). Residuals "royalties for repeated performance or broadcast" is attested by 1960.

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headliner (n.)
1891, "one who writes newspaper headlines;" 1896 as "one who stars in a performance;" from headline + -er (1).
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hafla (n.)
in reference to belly-dance performance and social gathering, by 1998, from Arabic hafla "party, social or family gathering."
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solo (n.)
1690s, "piece of music for one voice or instrument," from Italian solo, literally "alone," from Latin solus "alone" (see sole (adj.)). As an adjective in English from 1712, originally in the non-musical sense of "alone, unassisted;" in reference to aircraft flying from 1909. The verb is first attested 1858 in the musical sense, 1886 in a non-musical sense. Related: Soloed; soloing.
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