Etymology
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instrumentalist (n.)

"musical performer on an instrument," 1818, from instrumental in the musical sense + -ist. Perhaps from German Instrumentalist (18c.).

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keyed (adj.)

1796, "having keys," from key (n.) in the musical sense. Also "to set the tone (of a musical instrument) to a particular key; hence figurative keyed up "excited, high-strung" (1889).

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parsec (n.)

interstellar distance measure, 1913, from first elements of parallax second. It is the distance at which an object has parallax (viewed from Earth at an interval of six months and halved) of one second of arc, or about 3.26 light-years.

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interstice (n.)

early 15c., from Old French interstice (14c.) and directly from Latin interstitium "interval," literally "space between," from inter "between" (see inter-) + stem of stare "to stand" (from PIE root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm"). Related: Interstices.

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tricentennial (adj.)

also tri-centennial, "comprising three hundred years; including or relating to an interval of three hundred years," 1818; as a noun, "day observed as a festival in commemoration of something that happened three hundred years before," 1872. See tri- + centennial.

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pitch-pipe (n.)

"small musical pipe by which an instrument may be tuned or the proper pitch of a piece of music given," 1711, from pitch (n.1) in the musical sense + pipe (n.1).

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solo (n.)

1690s, "piece of music for one voice or instrument," from Italian solo, literally "alone," from Latin solus "alone" (see sole (adj.)). As an adjective in English from 1712, originally in the non-musical sense of "alone, unassisted;" in reference to aircraft flying from 1909. The verb is first attested 1858 in the musical sense, 1886 in a non-musical sense. Related: Soloed; soloing.

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tune (n.)

early 14c., "a musical sound," unexplained variant of tone (n.). From late 14c. as "a well-rounded succession of musical notes, an air, melody." Meaning "state of being in proper pitch" is from mid-15c.

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bugle (n.1)

"brass musical instrument," mid-14c., abbreviation of buglehorn "musical horn, hunting horn" (c. 1300), from Old French bugle "(musical) horn," also "wild ox, buffalo," from Latin buculus "heifer, young ox," diminutive of bos "ox, cow" (from PIE root *gwou- "ox, bull, cow"). Middle English also had the word in the "buffalo" sense and it survived in dialect with meaning "young bull." Modern French bugle is a 19c. borrowing from English.

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la (1)

musical note (sixth note of the diatonic scale), early 14c., see gamut. It represents the initial syllable of Latin labii "of the lips." In French and Italian it became the name of the musical note A, which is the sixth of the natural scale (C major).

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