Etymology
Advertisement
fleshy (adj.)
late 14c., "consisting of muscle and flesh," also "plump," from flesh (n.) + -y (2). Related: Fleshiness.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
quadratus (n.)

"a square-shaped muscle," 1727, from Latin quadratus "square, squared," past participle of quadrare "to square, make square; put in order," related to quadrus "a square," quattuor "four" (from PIE root *kwetwer- "four"). Especially the Quadratus femoris, the muscle situated at the back of the hip-joint.

Related entries & more 
gluteus (n.)
buttocks muscle, 1680s, from Modern Latin glutaeus, from Greek gloutos "the rump," in plural, "the buttocks."
Related entries & more 
soleus (n.)
muscle of the calf of the leg, 1670s, Modern Latin, from Latin solea "sole" (see sole (n.1)). So called for its flatness.
Related entries & more 
beefy (adj.)
"brawny, fleshy and solid," 1743, from beef (n.) in colloquial extended sense "human muscle" + -y (2). Related: Beefiness.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
myalgia (n.)

"muscular pain and tenderness," 1827, coined in Modern Latin (on analogy of neuralgia) from myo- "muscle" + -algia "pain." Related: Myalgic.

Related entries & more 
trapezius (n.)
muscle over the back of the neck, 1704, from Modern Latin trapezius (musculus), masc. adjective from trapezium (see trapezium). So called from the shape they form.
Related entries & more 
quadricep (n.)

large extensor muscle of the thigh, 1840, Modern Latin, from quadri- on model of bicep (q.v.). Related: Quadriceps. So called because divided into four parts.

Related entries & more 
myocardium (n.)

"muscular substance of the heart," 1866, from myo- "muscle" + Latinized form of Greek kardia "heart" (from PIE root *kerd- "heart"). Related: Myocardial; myocardiac; myocarditis.

Related entries & more 
phrenic (adj.)

"of or pertaining to the diaphragm," 1704, from Modern Latin phrenicus, from Greek phrēn "the diaphragm, muscle which parts the heart and lungs from the digestive organs" (see phreno-).

Related entries & more 

Page 3