Etymology
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triceps (n.)
the great extensor muscle, 1704, from Latin triceps "three-headed," from tri- "three" (see tri-) + -ceps, from caput "head" (from PIE root *kaput- "head"). So called because the muscle has three origins.
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delt (n.)

"deltoid muscle," short for deltoid (q.v.). Related: Delts.

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myasthenia (n.)

"muscular weakness," 1856, medical Latin; see myo- "muscle" + asthenia "weakness." Related: Myasthenic.

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fleshy (adj.)
late 14c., "consisting of muscle and flesh," also "plump," from flesh (n.) + -y (2). Related: Fleshiness.
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quadratus (n.)

"a square-shaped muscle," 1727, from Latin quadratus "square, squared," past participle of quadrare "to square, make square; put in order," related to quadrus "a square," quattuor "four" (from PIE root *kwetwer- "four"). Especially the Quadratus femoris, the muscle situated at the back of the hip-joint.

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beef up (v.)
"add strength," 1941, from college slang, from beef (n.) in slang sense of "muscle-power" (1851).
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gluteus (n.)
buttocks muscle, 1680s, from Modern Latin glutaeus, from Greek gloutos "the rump," in plural, "the buttocks."
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soleus (n.)
muscle of the calf of the leg, 1670s, Modern Latin, from Latin solea "sole" (see sole (n.1)). So called for its flatness.
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beefy (adj.)
"brawny, fleshy and solid," 1743, from beef (n.) in colloquial extended sense "human muscle" + -y (2). Related: Beefiness.
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myalgia (n.)

"muscular pain and tenderness," 1827, coined in Modern Latin (on analogy of neuralgia) from myo- "muscle" + -algia "pain." Related: Myalgic.

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