Etymology
Advertisement
No results were found for muck. Showing results for mock.
hair-raising (adj.)
"exciting," 1837, from hair + raise (v.). In 19c. works, sometimes as jocular mock-classical tricopherous.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
gibe (n.)

"a taunt," 1570s, from gibe (v.) "speak sneeringly" (1560s), of uncertain origin; perhaps from French giber "to handle roughly," or an alteration of gaber "to mock."

Related entries & more 
playwright (n.)

"writer or adapter of plays for the stage," 1680s (Ben Jonson used it 1610s as a mock-name), from play (n.) + wright (n.).

Related entries & more 
cruciverbalist (n.)

"maker of crossword puzzles," by 1977, mock-Latin, coined in English from Latin cruci-, combining form of crux "cross" (see crux) + verbum "word" (see verb).

Related entries & more 
monkey (v.)

1859, "to mock, mimic" (as a monkey does), from monkey (n.). Meaning "play foolish tricks" is from 1881. To monkey (with) "act in an idle or meddlesome manner" is by 1884. Related: Monkeyed; monkeying.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Hudibras 
title of Samuel Butler's 1663 mock-heroic satire against the Puritans; the name is said to be from Hugh de Bras, knight of the Round Table. Related: Hudibrastic (1712).
Related entries & more 
deride (v.)

"laugh at in contempt, mock, ridicule, scorn by laughter," 1520s, from French derider, from Latin deridere "to ridicule, laugh to scorn," from de "down" (see de-) + ridere "to laugh" (see risible). Related: Derided; deriding.

Related entries & more 
discombobulate (v.)

"to upset, embarrass," 1834, discombobricate, American English, fanciful mock-Latin coinage of a type popular then. Compare, on a similar pattern, confusticate (1852), absquatulate (1840), spifflicate "confound, beat" (1850), scrumplicate "eat" (1890). Related: discombobulating; discombobulation.

Related entries & more 
illude (v.)
early 15c., "to trick, deceive; treat with scorn or mockery," from Latin illudere "to make sport of, scoff at, mock, jeer at," from assimilated form of in- "in, into" (from PIE root *en "in") + ludere "to play" (see ludicrous).
Related entries & more 
omnium gatherum (n.)

1520s, "miscellaneous collection," a humorous mock-Latin coinage from Latin omnium "of all things" (genitive plural of omnis; see omni-) + a feigned Latin form of English gather. Earlier form was omnegadrium (early 15c.), omnigatherum.

Related entries & more 

Page 3