Etymology
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zugzwang (n.)
1904, in chess, from German Zugzwang, literally "move-compulsion," from Zug "move (in chess), a drawing, pulling, a stretch," from Old High German ziohan "to pull," from Proto-Germanic *teuhan, from PIE root *deuk- "to lead."
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shuttle (v.)

1540s, transitive, "move (something) rapidly to and fro," from shuttle (n.); the sense of "transport via a shuttle service" is recorded from 1930. The intransitive sense of "go or move backward and forward like a shuttle" is from 1843. Related: Shuttled; shuttling.

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reciprocate (v.)

1610s, "to give and return mutually," a back-formation from reciprocation, or else from Latin reciprocatus, past participle of reciprocare "rise and fall, move back and forth; reverse the motion of," from reciprocus "returning the same way, alternating" (see reciprocal). Sense of "cause to move back and forth" is from 1650s; intransitive sense of "move backward and forward" is from 1670s. Meaning "to give or do in response, act in return or response" is from 1820. Related: Reciprocated; reciprocating.

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immigrate (v.)
"to pass into a place as a new inhabitant or resident," especially "to move to a country where one is not a native, for the purpose of settling permanently there," 1620s, from Latin immigratus, past participle of immigrare "to remove, go into, move in," from assimilated form of in- "into, in, on, upon" (from PIE root *en "in") + migrare "to move" (see migration). Related: Immigrated; immigrating.
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jussive (adj.)

"of a grammatical mode expressing command," 1825, with -ive + Latin iuss-, past participle stem of iubere "to bid, command, to order," from PIE root *ioudh- "to cause to move" (cognates: Sanskrit yudhya- "to fight," yodha- "to rebel;" Greek hysmine "battle, fight;" Lithuanian judėti "to move" (intransitive), judus "belligerent"). The sense evolution in Latin was from "cause to move" to "order." As a noun from 1836.

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shunt (v.)

mid-13c., shunten, "to shy, start aside or back, move suddenly," perhaps from shunen, shonen "to shun" (see shun), and altered by influence of shot or shut. The transitive meaning "to turn aside" is from late 14c.; that of "move out of the way" is from 1706. Adopted by railways by 1842, "move cars or a train from a main line to a sidetrack." Related: Shunted; shunting.

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wobble (v.)
1650s, wabble, probably from Low German wabbeln "to wobble;" cognate with Old Norse vafla "hover about, totter," related to vafra "move unsteadily," from Proto-Germanic *wab- "to move back and forth," perhaps from PIE *webh- "to weave" (see waver). Form with -o- is from 1851. Related: Wobbled; wobbling. The noun is attested from 1690s.
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key (adj.)
"crucially important," 1913, from key (n.1). Perhaps from or reinforced by key move, in chess, "first move in a solution to a set problem" (1827), which to an experienced player opens the way to see how the solution will develop.
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emotive (adj.)

1735, "causing movement," from Latin emot-, past-participle stem of emovere "to move out, move away" (see emotion) + -ive. Meaning "capable of emotion" is from 1881; that of "evoking emotions" is from 1923, originally in literary criticism. Related: Emotively; emotiveness.

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advancement (n.)

c. 1300, avauncement, "a raising to a higher rank," also "promotion, assistance," from Old French avancement "advancement; profit, advance payment," from avancir "move forward" (see advance (v.)). The unetymological -d- is from 16c. The meaning "act of helping to move something forward" is from 1550s.

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