Etymology
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actuation (n.)
"a putting in motion, communication of force," 1620s, noun of action from actuate (v.).
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motive (adj.)

late 14c., "having control of motion, causing motion, having power to move someone or something," from Old French motif "moving" or directly from Medieval Latin motivus "moving, impelling," from past-participle stem of movere "to move" (from PIE root *meue- "to push away").

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agile (adj.)

"having quickness of motion, nimble, active" (of body or mind), 1580s, from French agile (14c.) and directly from Latin agilis "nimble, quick," from agere "to set in motion, keep in movement" (from PIE root *ag- "to drive, draw out or forth, move"). Related: Agilely.

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kinesthesia (n.)

also kinaesthesia, "the sense of muscular movement," 1888, Modern Latin compound of elements from Greek kinein "to set in motion; to move" (from PIE root *keie- "to set in motion") + aisthēsis "perception" (see anesthesia). Earlier was kinaesthesis (1880).

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nod (n.)

"short, quick, forward and downward motion of the head," voluntary or not, 1530s, from nod (v.).

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cinematographer (n.)

1897, "one who takes cinematic pictures," agent noun from cinematograph "motion picture projector" (see cinema).

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stall (n.3)
"action of losing lift, power, or motion," 1918 of aircraft, 1959 of automobile engines, from stall (v.1).
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cite (v.)

mid-15c., "to summon, call upon officially," from Old French citer "to summon" (14c.), from Latin citare "to summon, urge, call; put in sudden motion, call forward; rouse, excite," frequentative of ciere "to move, set in motion, stir, rouse, call, invite" from PIE root *keie- "to set in motion, to move to and fro."

Sense of "call forth a passage of writing, quote the words of another" is first attested 1530s. Related: Cited; citing.

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talkie (n.)
"motion picture with sound," 1913, from earlier talking picture (1908), from talk (v.).
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shrug (n.)
a shoulder motion meant to express indifference, want of an answer, etc., 1590s, from shrug (v.).
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