Etymology
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mother lode 

"important vein of an ore or mineral in rock," 1849, from mother (n.1) + lode (n.); said to be a translation of Mexican Spanish veta madre, a name given to rich silver veins. The American use is first in reference to a conspicuous vein of quartz rich in gold discovered during the gold rush in the Sierra Nevada of California. The colloquial or figurative sense of "richest source of something" is by 1916.

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law-breaker (n.)
also lawbreaker, mid-15c., from law (n.) + agent noun from break (v.). Old English had lahbreca.
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pre-law (adj.)
"of or pertaining to study in preparation for law school," 1961, American English, from pre- + law (school).
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common law (n.)

mid-14c., "the customary and unwritten laws of England as embodied in commentaries and old cases" (see common (adj.)), as opposed to statute law. Phrase common-law marriage is attested from 1909.

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law-abiding (adj.)
"obedient to the laws," 1828, from law (n.) + abiding.
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law-giver (n.)
also lawgiver, "one who makes or enacts a code of laws," late 14c., from law (n.) + agent noun from give (v.).
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Mother Hubbard 

in reference to a kind of loose, full gown worn by women, 1878, from Old Mother Hubbard, nursery rhyme, which was printed 1805, written by Sarah Catherine Martin (1768-1826) but based on earlier material of unknown origin. The name is attested from 1591.

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earth-mother (n.)
1870, folkloric spirit of the earth, conceived as sensual, maternal; often a translation of German erdmutter. Earth-goddess is from 1837.
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Parkinson's Law 
1955 (in the "Economist" of Nov. 19), named for its deviser, British historian and journalist Cyril Northcote Parkinson (1909-1993): "work expands to fill the time available for its completion."
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Boyle's law (n.)

named for 17c. Irish-born chemist and physicist Robert Boyle, who published it in 1662.

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