Etymology
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motive (adj.)

late 14c., "having control of motion, causing motion, having power to move someone or something," from Old French motif "moving" or directly from Medieval Latin motivus "moving, impelling," from past-participle stem of movere "to move" (from PIE root *meue- "to push away").

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motor-bike (n.)

also motorbike, "motorcycle," 1903, from motor (n.) + bike (n.).

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motorcade (n.)

"procession of motorcars," 1909, from motor- + suffix from cavalcade.

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motionless (adj.)

"without motion, being at rest," 1590s, from motion (n.) + -less. Related: Motionlessly; motionlessness.

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mother-ship (n.)

"large ship or craft escorting or having charge of a number of other, usually smaller, craft," 1890, from mother (n.1) + ship (n.).

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motor (v.)

travel or drive in a motor vehicle," "1896, from motor (n.). Related: Motored; motoring.

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motiveless (adj.)

"having no motive or aim," 1798, from motive (n.) + -less.

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mothball (n.)
also moth-ball, moth ball, "naphthalene ball stored among fabrics to keep off moths," 1891, from moth + ball (n.1).
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motif (n.)

"theme, predominant feature that recurs often in an artistic or dramatic work," 1848, from French motif "dominant idea, theme," from Medieval Latin motivus "moving, impelling," from past participle stem of movere "to move" (from PIE root *meue- "to push away"). Also a Middle English form of motive (late 14c.).

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motive (n.)

late 14c., "something brought forward, a proposition, assertion, or argument" (a sense now obsolete), from Old French motif "will, drive, motivation," noun use of adjective, literally "moving," from Medieval Latin motivus "moving, impelling," from Latin motus "a moving, motion," past participle of movere "to move" (from PIE root *meue- "to push away").

Meaning "that which inwardly moves a person to behave a certain way, mental state or force which induces an action of volition" is from early 15c. Hence "design or object one has in any action."

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