Etymology
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anaphalantiasis (n.)
"the falling out of the eyebrows," 1853, earlier in French and German, from Greek anaphalantiasis "baldness in front," from ana "up" (see ana-) + phalanthos "bald in front."
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pas devant les enfants 
French: "Not in front of the children."
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facade (n.)
1650s, "front of a building," from French façade (16c.), from Italian facciata "the front of a building," from faccia "face," from Vulgar Latin *facia (see face (n.)). Figurative use by 1845.
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frons (n.)
"forehead," from Latin frons (see front (n.)).
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before (adv., prep.)
Old English beforan "in front of, in former times; in the presence of, in front of in time or position," from Proto-Germanic *bi- "by" (see by) + *forana "from the front," adverbial derivative of *fora (from PIE root *per- (1) "forward," hence "in front of, before"). Compare Old Frisian bifara, Old Saxon biforan, Old High German bifora, German bevor.

As a conjunction, "previous to the time when," from c. 1200. Contrasting before and after in illustrations is from Hogarth (1768). Before the mast in old sailing ship jargon in reference to the life of a common sailor is from the place of their berths, in front of the fore-mast.
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vor 
German, "before, in front of" (see fore).
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proscenium (n.)

c. 1600, "stage of an ancient theater," from Latin proscaenium, from Greek proskēnion "the space in front of the scenery," also "entrance of a tent," from pro "in front, before" (see pro-) + skēnē "stage, tent, booth" (see scene). Modern sense of "space between the curtain and the orchestra" (often including the curtain and its framework) is attested from 1807. Hence, figuratively, "foreground, front" (1640s).

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waterfront (n.)
also water-front, 1834, American English, from water (n.1) + front (n.). To cover the waterfront "deal with thoroughly" is attested from 1913; I Cover the Waterfront was a 1932 best-seller by San Diego newspaperman Max Miller.
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ahead (adv.)
1620s, "at the head, in front," from a- "on" (see a- (1)) + head (n.) "front." Originally nautical (opposed to astern). Meaning "forward, onward" (the sense in go ahead) is from 1640s. To be ahead of (one's) time attested by 1837.
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