Etymology
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moonrise (n.)

"rising of the moon, appearance of the moon above the horizon," 1728, from moon (n.) + rise (n.). Verbal noun moon-rising is from late 14c. Browning used moonset (1845) but it seems to be rare.

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menses (n.)
"monthly discharge of blood from the uterus," 1590s, from Latin menses, plural of mensis "month" (see moon (n.)).
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moonwalk (n.)

1966, "a walking on the moon," from moon (n.) + walk (n.). As a dance move in which the dancer  moves backward while appearing to walk forward it was popularized 1983 by Michael Jackson. 

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trimester (n.)

1821, "period of three months," from French trimestre (early 17c.), from Latin trimestris "of three months," from tri- "three" (see tri-) + mensis "month" (see moon (n.)). Specific obstetrics sense is attested from 1900. Related: Trimestrial.

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menstrual (adj.)

late 14c., "pertaining to menses of females," from Old French menstruel and directly from Latin menstrualis "monthly," especially "of or having monthly courses," from menstruus "of a month, every month, monthly, pertaining to a month," from mensis "month" (see moon (n.)). Occasionally, in astronomy, "monthly" (1590s).

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menstruous (adj.)

"having the monthly flow or discharge," early 15c., from Old French menstrueus and directly from Medieval Latin *menstruosus, from Latin menstruum "of or belonging to menstruation," from menstruus (adj.) "that happens every month, monthly," from mensis "month" (see moon (n.)).

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meniscus (n.)

"a crescent or crescent-shaped body," 1690s in reference to lenses convex on one side, concave on the other, and thicker in the middle; c. 1812 in reference to liquid surfaces, Modern Latin meniscus, from Greek meniskos "lunar crescent," diminutive of mene "moon" (see moon (n.)). Related: Meniscoid; mensicoidal; mensical; mensicate.

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menarche (n.)

"first appearance of menstruation," 1896, from German menarche (1895), from Greek men (genitive menos) "month" (see moon (n.)) + arkhē "beginning" (verbal noun of arkhein "to be the first;" see archon).

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menstruation (n.)

"the period of menstruation," 1680s, from past-participle stem of Late Latin menstruare, from menstruus "monthly" (from mensis "month;" see moon (n.)) + -ation. Old English equivalent was monaðblot "month-blood." Middle English had menstrue (n.), late 14c., from Old French menstrue, from Latin menstruum.

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amenorrhea (n.)
suppression of menstruation, especially from a cause other than age or pregnancy, 1804, Modern Latin, from Greek privative prefix a- "not" (see a- (3)) + men "month" (see moon (n.)) + rhein "to flow" (from PIE root *sreu- "to flow"). Related: amenorrheal.
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