Etymology
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moonlight (n.)

"light of the moon," c. 1300, from moon (n.) + light (n.). Similar formation in Dutch maanlicht, German Mondlicht.

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moolah (n.)

also moola, "money," c. 1920, American English slang, of unknown origin. Earlier it was a form of the Islamic title mullah.

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moonraker (n.)

also moon-raker, "stupid or silly person," in England, a name traditionally given to Wiltshire people, 1787, from the stock joke about fools who mistook the reflection of the moon in a pond for a cheese and tried to rake it out. But as told in Wiltshire, the men were surprised trying to rake up kegs of smuggled brandy, and put off the revenuers by acting foolish. Compare moonshine. Related: Moonraking.

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mooreeffoc (n.)

"coffee-room, viewed from the inside through a glass door, as it was seen by Dickens on a dark London day; ... used by Chesterton to denote the queerness of things that have become trite, when they are seen suddenly from a new angle." [J.R.R. Tolkien, "On Fairy Stories"]

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moorland (n.)

"tract of waste land," Old English morlond; see moor (n.) + land (n.).

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moot (v.)

"to debate, argue for and against" (mid-14c.), from Old English motian "to meet, talk, discuss, argue, plead," from mot "meeting" (see moot (n.)). Meaning "raise or bring forward for discussion" is from 1680s. Related: Mooted; mooting.

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mooring (n.)

early 15c., "action or process of making a ship secure in a particular place by means of anchors, cables, etc.," verbal noun from moor (v.). From 1775 as "place where a vessel can be moored" (compare moorings). 

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moonrise (n.)

"rising of the moon, appearance of the moon above the horizon," 1728, from moon (n.) + rise (n.). Verbal noun moon-rising is from late 14c. Browning used moonset (1845) but it seems to be rare.

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moonglade (n.)

"the track of moonlight on water," 1860, American English, from moon (n.) + glade (n.).

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moon-face (n.)

"a full, round face," 1854, from moon (n.) + face (n.) . Related: Moon-faced.

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