Etymology
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-plasia 
word-forming element in biology and medicine denoting "formation, growth, development," from Modern Latin -plasia, from Greek plasis "molding, formation," from plassein "to mold" (see plasma).
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plastid (n.)

"unicellular organism, individual mass of protoplasm," 1876, from German plastid, coined by Haeckel from Greek plastos "formed, molded" (verbal adjective from plassein "to mold;" see plasma) + -id.

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-plasty 
word-forming element meaning "act or process of forming," also "plastic surgery" applied to a specific part, from Greek -plastia, from plastos "molded, formed," verbal adjective from plassein "to mold" (see plasma).
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-plast 
word-forming element denoting "something made," from Greek plastos "formed, molded," verbal adjective from plassein "to mold" (see plasma). Used to form names of small particles of living matter.
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pig iron (n.)

"iron in pigs," as it comes from a blast furnace, iron that has been run while molten into a mold in sand, 1660s; see pig (n.2) + iron (n.).

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plasm (n.)

1610s, "mold or matrix in which anything is cast or formed to a particular shape" (a sense now obsolete); see plasma. In biology, the meaning "living matter of a cell, protoplasm" is attested by 1864.

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ingot (n.)
late 14c., "mold in which metal is cast," probably from in- (2) "in" + Old English goten, past participle of geotan "to pour" (from PIE root *gheu- "to pour"). Sense of "mass of cast metal" first attested early 15c.
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dysplasia (n.)

"abnormal growth or development of tissue, cells, etc.," 1935, Modern Latin, from dys- + -plasia, from Greek plasis "molding, conformation," from plassein "to mold" (originally "to spread thin," from PIE root *pele- (2) "flat; to spread") + abstract noun ending -ia. Related: Dysplastic.

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plowshare (n.)

"the part of a plow which cuts the ground at the bottom of the furrow and raises the slice to the mold-board to be turned," late 14c., from plow + share (n.2). To beat (one's) swords into plowshares as an image of peace made among peoples formerly at strife is from the Old Testament (Isaiah ii.4, Micah iv.3).

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fromage (n.)
French for "cheese," from French fromage, originally formage (13c.), from Medieval Latin formaticum (source also of Italian formaggio), properly "anything made in a form," from Latin forma "shape, form, mold" (see form (v.)). Papias the Lombard (11c.) has caseus vulgo formaticum.
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