Etymology
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colostrum (n.)

"the first milk secreted in the breasts after childbirth," 1570s, from Latin colostrum "first milk from an animal," earlier colustra, a word of unknown etymology.

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*g(a)lag- 
also *g(a)lakt-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "milk."

It forms all or part of: ablactation; cafe au lait; galactic; galaxy; lactate (v.); lactate (n.); lactation; lacteal; lactescence; lactic; lactivorous; lacto-; lactose; latte; lettuce.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Latin lac (genitive lactis) "milk;" Greek gala (genitive galaktos), "milk;" Armenian dialectal kaxc' "milk." The initial "g" probably was lost in Latin by dissimilation. This and the separate root *melg-, account for words for "milk" in most of the Indo-European languages. The absence of a common word for it is considered a mystery.
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emulgent 

1570s (adj.), "draining out;" 1610s (n.), in anatomy, "an emulgent vessel," from Latin emulgentem (nominative emulgens), present participle of emulgere "to milk out, drain out, exhaust," from assimilated form of ex "out" (see ex-) + mulgere "to milk" (from PIE root *melg- "to rub off; to milk"). Related: Emulgence.

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lactation (n.)

1660s, "process of suckling an infant," from French lactation, from Late Latin lactationem (nominative lactatio) "a suckling," noun of action from past-participle stem of lactare "to suckle," from lac (genitive lactis) "milk" (from PIE root *g(a)lag- "milk"). Meaning "process of secreting milk from the breasts" first recorded 1857. Related: Lactational.

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evaporate (v.)

early 15c., "draw off (humors or spirits) as vapor," from Late Latin evaporatum, past participle of evaporare "disperse in vapor" (see evaporation). Intransitive sense by 1560s. Figurative use by 1610s. Related: Evaporated; evaporating. Evaporated milk (1870) is processed milk with some of the liquid removed by evaporation; it differs from condensed milk in being unsweetened.

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bonnyclabber (n.)
also bonny-clabber, "clotted or coagulated soured milk," 1620s (in shortened form clabber), from Modern Irish bainne "milk" (from Middle Irish banne "drop," also, rarely, "milk"; cognate with Sanskrit bindu- "drop") + claba "thick." Compare Irish and Gaelic clabar "mud," which sometimes has made its way into English (Yeats, etc.).
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*melg- 

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to rub off," also "to stroke; to milk," in reference to the hand motion involved in milking an animal. Compare *g(a)lag-.

It forms all or part of: emulgent; emulsify; emulsion; milch; milk.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit marjati "wipes off;" Greek amelgein, Latin mulgere, Old Church Slavonic mlesti, Lithuanian melžti "to milk;" Old Irish melg "milk."

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manganese (n.)

1670s as the name of a black mineral, oxide of manganese (used from ancient times in glassmaking for removing coloring matter), from French manganèse (16c.), from Italian manganese, alteration or corruption of Medieval Latin magnesia (see magnesia). From 1783 in English as the name of the metallic element.

From the middle of the eighteenth century the combinations of manganese were studied by various chemists, and finally, in 1774, the metal manganese was isolated by Gahn, but for years there was much confusion in regard to its specific name, and it was not until after the beginning of the present century that the name manganese (mangan in German) began to be generally adopted. [Century Dictionary, 1897]

Related: Mangano-, manganic, manganous, manganate.

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homogenization (n.)
1803 (specifically of milk, 1905); see homogenize + noun ending -ation.
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