Etymology
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clinch (n.)

1620s, "method of fastening ropes," nautical, from clinch (v.). Also compare clench (n.). Meaning "a fastening by bending a driven nail" is from 1650s. In pugilism, "grappling at close quarters," from 1875.

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quarter (v.)

"to cut in quarters, divide into four equal parts," mid-14c., from quarter (n.1). From late 14c. specifically as the word for a form of criminal punishment (Old English had slitcwealm "death by rending"). Related: Quartered; quartering. Middle English also had a verb quartle "to divide into four parts" (late 14c.).

The meaning "furnish with lodgings, shelter, etc. as a temporary means of living" is recorded from 1590s (see quarters), often specifically "to put up soldiers" under orders from authority.

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repartition (n.)

1550s, "partition, distribution," especially of troops or their quarters, from re-, here perhaps intensive, + partition (n.). From 1835 as "a repeated or fresh allotment."

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militarize (v.)
"turn to military use, give a military aspect to" (transitive), 1829, see military + -ize. Related: Militarized; militarizing.
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militarism (n.)

1841, "military spirit, addiction to war or military practice," from French militarisme, from militaire "military" (see military); also see -ism. By 1864 in reference to nations or peoples, "predominance of the military class, maintenance of national power by means of standing armies."

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campaign (n.)
1640s, "operation of an army in the field," during a single season, in a particular region, or in a definite enterprise; from French campagne "campaign," literally "open country," from Old French champagne "countryside, open country" (suited to military maneuvers), from Late Latin campania "level country" (source of Italian campagna, Spanish campaña, Portuguese campanha), from Latin campus "a field" (see campus).

Old armies spent winters in quarters and took to the "open field" to seek battle in summer. Generalized to "continued or sustained aggressive operations for the accomplishment of some purpose" (1790); in U.S., especially "political activity before an election, marked by organized action in influencing the voters" [DAE], attested from 1809.
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dungaree (n.)

"A coarse cotton stuff, generally blue, worn by sailors" [Century Dictionary, 1897], 1610s, dongerijns, from Hindi dungri "coarse calico," said to be from the name of a village, now one of the quarters of Bombay. Dungarees "trousers made of dungaree" is by 1868.

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pantothenic (adj.)
denoting a B-complex vitamin acid, 1933, from Greek pantothen "from all quarters, on every side," from panto-, combining form of pantos, genitive of pan "all" (see pan-) + -ic. So called because it was found in so many sources.
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orderly (n.)

"military attendant who carries orders," 1781, short for orderly corporal, etc. Extended 1809 to an attendant at a hospital (originally a military hospital) charged with keeping things clean and in order, from orderly (adj.) in the military sense of "of or pertaining to communication or execution of orders" (1723).

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medevac 

"military helicopter for taking wounded soldiers to a hospital," 1966, U.S. military, formed from elements of medical evacuation.

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