Etymology
Advertisement
orderly (n.)

"military attendant who carries orders," 1781, short for orderly corporal, etc. Extended 1809 to an attendant at a hospital (originally a military hospital) charged with keeping things clean and in order, from orderly (adj.) in the military sense of "of or pertaining to communication or execution of orders" (1723).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
pinhead (n.)

also pin-head, "the head of a pin," 1660s, from pin (n.) + head (n.). From mid-15c. as the type of something small or a minuscule amount. Meaning "person of little intelligence" (and/or a small head) is by 1896. Related: Pinheaded

Related entries & more 
simple-minded (adj.)

"lacking intelligence or penetration, unsophisticated," 1744, from simple (adj.) + -minded. Simple (adj.) in a similar sense is from c. 1200. Middle English also had simple-hearted "timid; ingenuous, sincere." Related: Simple-mindedly; simple-mindedness.

Related entries & more 
medevac 

"military helicopter for taking wounded soldiers to a hospital," 1966, U.S. military, formed from elements of medical evacuation.

Related entries & more 
civil service (n.)

"the executive branch of the public service," as distinguished from the military, naval, legislative, or judicial, 1765, originally in reference to non-military staff of the East India Company, from civil in the sense "not military." Civil servant is from 1792.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
emotional (adj.)

1821, "pertaining to emotion," from emotion + -al (1). Meaning "characterized by or subject to emotions" is attested by 1857. Related: Emotionally. Emotional intelligence was coined by mid-1960s, popular from mid-1980s.

Related entries & more 
stupidity (n.)

1540s, "want of intelligence," from Latin stupiditatem (nominative stupiditas) "dullness, stupidity, senselessness," from stupidus "confounded, amazed; dull, foolish" (see stupid). It also at various times meant "lack of feeling or emotion" (1560s); "stupor, numbness" (c. 1600).

Related entries & more 
samurai (n.)

one of the military class in Japanese feudalism, originally a military retainer of a daimio, 1727, from Japanese samurai "warrior, knight," variant of saburai, nominal form of sabura(h)u "to be in attendance, to serve."

Related entries & more 
firing (n.)

1540s, "action of applying fire or setting on fire," verbal noun from fire (v.). From c. 1600 as "act of discharging firearms." Firing squad is attested from 1891 in reference to military executions; earlier as "those selected to fire over the grave of anyone interred with military honors" (1864); earlier in both senses is firing-party (1798 in reference to military executions; 1776 in reference to military funerals).

Related entries & more 
intellection (n.)

c. 1400, intellecioun "meaning, purpose;" mid-15c., "the understanding;" 1610s, "an act of understanding," from Old French intelleccion and directly from Medieval Latin intellectionem (nominative intellectio), noun of action from past participle stem of Latin intelligere "to understand, discern" (see intelligence).

Related entries & more 

Page 3