Etymology
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militarism (n.)

1841, "military spirit, addiction to war or military practice," from French militarisme, from militaire "military" (see military); also see -ism. By 1864 in reference to nations or peoples, "predominance of the military class, maintenance of national power by means of standing armies."

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culvert (n.)

"a drain of brickwork or masonry under a road, railroad, etc.," 1773, origin unknown; OED calls it "A recent word of obscure origin." Perhaps, as Weekley suggested long ago, it is the name of a long-forgotten engineer or bridge-builder.

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machinist (n.)

1706, "engineer, mechanical inventor, constructor of machines and engines," a hybrid from machine (n.) + -ist. Meaning "machine operator" is attested from 1879; in  U.S. Navy ratings, "an engine-room artificer or attendant," by 1880.

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electioneer (v.)

"to try to influence an election by public speaking, solicitation of votes, etc.; to work for the success of a candidate or of a party in an election," 1760 (implied in verbal noun electioneering), from election, probably on model of auctioneer, as the verb engineer was not yet in use.

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Fokker (n.)

German monoplane of World War I, 1913, from name of Anton "Anthony" H.G. Fokker (1890-1939), Dutch engineer and inventor who started his aircraft manufacturing business in Germany in 1912.

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hydroplane (n.)

"motorboat that glides on the surface of water," 1895, coined by U.S. engineer Harvey D. Williams ["Sibley Journal of Engineering," Cornell University, vol. x, p.81]; from hydro- + ending from airplane.

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Moog (n.)

electronic musical instrument, 1969, from Robert A. Moog (1934-2005), the U.S. engineer who invented it.

The point is that I don't design stuff for myself. I'm a toolmaker. I design things that other people want to use. [Robert Moog, interview in "Salon," 2000]
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baud (n.)

1932, originally a unit of speed in telegraphy, coined in French in 1929 in honor of French inventor and engineer Jean-Maurice-Émile Baudot (1845-1903), who designed a telegraph printing system.

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Linux 

computer operating system, named for Linux kernel, written 1991 by software engineer Linus Torvalds (b. 1969) of Finland (who coined the word but did not choose it as the name).

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spray-paint (n.)

"type of paint suitable for application by air-spraying," 1897, from spray (v.) + paint (v.). A spray paint-brush, and the technology of spray-painting, are described in "The Electrical Engineer" of Jan. 20, 1893. As a verb by 1928. Related: Spray-painted; spray-painting.

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