Etymology
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plein-air (adj.)
1894, from French phrase en plein air, literally "in the open air." The style developed among French impressionists c. 1870.
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air-bag (n.)

"sealed bag filled with air," 1836, from air (n.1) + bag (n.). In early use a means of raising sunken ships, etc.; as an automobile safety feature by 1970.

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air-brake (n.)
brake that works by compressed air power, 1872, from air (n.1) + brake (n.1). Related: Air-brakes.
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air-shaft (n.)
long narrow passage for admitting air, 1690s, from air (n.1) + shaft (n.2).
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air-brush (n.)
also airbrush, "atomizer used for spraying liquid ink or paint," 1883, from air (n.1) + brush (n.1). Invented a few years earlier but called at first paint distributer; renamed by U.S. manufacturer Liberty Walkup, who improved the design. As a verb by 1902. Related: Airbrushed; airbrushing.
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air-gun (n.)
1753, "gun in which condensed air propels the ball or bullet," 1753, from air (n.1) + gun (n.).
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air-port (n.2)
"small opening in the side of a ship to admit air and light," 1788, from air (n.1) + port (n.2).
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closeness (n.)
mid-15c., "confined condition," from close (adj.) + -ness. Meaning "stuffiness" (of air) is from 1590s; meaning "nearness" is from 1716.
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airborne (adj.)
also air-borne, 1640s, "carried through the air," from air (n.1) + borne. Of military units, from 1937.
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airtight (adj.)
also air-tight, "impermeable to air," 1760, from air (n.1) + tight. Figurative sense of "incontrovertible" (of arguments, alibis, etc.) is from 1929.
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