Etymology
Advertisement
parts (n.)

"personal qualities, gifts of ability, share of mental endowments or acquirements," 1560s, from part (n.).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
scatterbrain (n.)

also scatter-brain, "thoughtless, giddy person; one incapable of serious, connected thought," 1790, from adjective scatter-brained (1764); see scatter (v.) + brain (n.). Scattered in the figurative mental sense is by 1620s, and the use of scattering for "mental distraction" dates to mid-15c. For the formation, compare scatter-good "spendthrift" (early 13c. as a surname).

Related entries & more 
languishment (n.)

1540s, "sorrow caused by love;" 1590s, "sickness; mental distress," from languish (v.) + -ment.

Related entries & more 
psychoactive (adj.)

also psycho-active, "of or pertaining to drugs that affect mental states," 1959, from psycho- + active.

Related entries & more 
distraction (n.)

mid-15c., distraccioun, "the drawing away of the mind from one point or course to another or others," from Latin distractionem (nominative distractio) "a pulling apart, separating," noun of action from past-participle stem of distrahere "draw in different directions" (see distract).

Sense of "a drawing of the mind in different directions, mental confusion or bewilderment" is from 1590s. Meaning "violent mental disturbance, excitement simulating madness" (in driven to distraction, etc.) is from c. 1600. Meaning "a thing or fact that causes mental diversion or bewilderment" is from 1610s.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
amazement (n.)
1590s, "mental stupefaction, state of being astonished," from amaze + -ment. Meaning "overwhelming wonder" is c. 1600.
Related entries & more 
attention deficit disorder (n.)
(abbreviated ADD), introduced as a diagnosis in the third edition of the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (1980), from attention in the "power of mental concentration" sense. Expanded to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder ("the co-existence of attentional problems and hyperactivity, with each behavior occurring infrequently alone;" ADHD) in DSM-III (1987).
Related entries & more 
paranoia (n.)

"mental disorder characterized by systematized delusions of more or less definite scope," 1848 (earlier paranoea 1811), from Greek paranoia "mental derangement, madness," from paranoos "mentally ill, insane," from para- "beside, beyond" (see para- (1)) + noos "mind," which is of uncertain origin.

FOR several years frequent descriptions have been given in the foreign journals, especially German and Italian, of the forms of insanity designated by the names Paranoia, Verrücktkeit, and Wahnsinn. ["Paranoia — Systematized Delusions and Mental Degenerations," J. Séglas (transl. William Noyes), 1888]
Related entries & more 
incline (n.)
c. 1600, "mental tendency," from incline (v.). The literal meaning "slant, slope" is attested from 1846 in railroading.
Related entries & more 
inclined (adj.)
c. 1300, "having a mental tendency;" 1540s, "having a physical slope," past-participle adjective from incline (v.).
Related entries & more 

Page 3