Etymology
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liquescent (adj.)
"having a tendency to become liquid," 1727, from Latin liquescentem (nominative liquescens), present participle of liquescere "to melt," from liquere "to be liquid" (see liquid (adj.)) Related: Liquescency (1650s).
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viscous (adj.)
late 14c., from Anglo-French viscous and directly from Late Latin viscosus "sticky," from Latin viscum "anything sticky, birdlime made from mistletoe, mistletoe," probably from PIE root *weis- "to melt away, flow" (used of foul or malodorous fluids); see virus.
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perfuse (v.)

early 15c., perfusen, "to wash away;" 1520s, "to sprinkle, pour or spread over or through," from Latin perfusus, past participle of perfundere "to pour over, besprinkle," from per (see per) + fundere "to pour, melt" (from nasalized form of PIE root *gheu- "to pour").

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fuse (v.)
1680s, "to melt, make liquid by heat" (transitive), back-formation from fusion. Intransitive sense, "to become liquid," attested from 1800. Figurative sense of "blend different things, blend or unite as if by melting together" is recorded by 1817. Intransitive figurative sense "become intermingled or blended" is by 1873. Related: Fused; fusing.
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fluor (n.)
1660s, an old chemistry term for "minerals which were readily fusible and useful as fluxes in smelting" [Flood], from Latin fluor, originally meaning "a flowing, flow," from fluere "to flow, stream, run, melt" (see fluent). Said to be from a translation of the German miners' name, flusse. Since 1771 applied to minerals containing fluorine, especially calcium fluoride (fluorspar or fluorite).
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conflate (v.)

mid-15c., "to mold or cast from molten metal" (a sense now obsolete), from Latin conflatus, past participle of conflare "to blow up, kindle, light; bring together, compose," also "to melt together," literally "to blow together," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + flare "to blow" (from PIE root *bhle- "to blow").

From c. 1600 as "to bring together from various sources." In reference to text, "to form by inadvertent combination of two readings of the same words," from 1885.

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liquidation (n.)

1570s, in law, of debts, noun of action from past-participle stem of Late Latin liquidare "melt, make liquid" (see liquidate). Originally as a legal term in reference to assets; of companies going out of business, 1869; of inconvenient groups of persons, "a killing, a wiping out," 1925 in communist writings. In O. Henry, "the act of taking a drink of liquor."

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infuse (v.)
early 15c., "to pour in, introduce, soak (something in liquid)," from Latin infusus, past participle of infundere "to pour into, pour out; press in, crowd in; mix, mingle," from in- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + fundere "to pour, melt" (from nasalized form of PIE root *gheu- "to pour"). Related: Infused; infusing; infusory; infusorial.
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futile (adj.)

"incapable of producing result," 1550s, from French futile or directly from Latin futilis, futtilis "vain, worthless, futile," a figurative use, literally "pouring out easily, easily emptied" (the Latin adjective used as a noun meant "a water vessel broad above and pointed below"), hence "leaky, unreliable," from fundere "to pour, melt," from nasalized form of PIE root *gheu- "to pour." Related: Futilely.

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evanesce (v.)
"vanish by degrees, melt into thin air," 1817, a back-formation from evanescence, or else from Latin evanescere "disappear, vanish, pass away," figuratively "be forgotten, be wasted," from assimilated form of ex "out" (see ex-) + vanescere "vanish," inchoative verb from vanus "empty, void" (from PIE *wano-, suffixed form of root *eue- "to leave, abandon, give out").
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