Etymology
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convene (v.)

early 15c., (intransitive) "to come together, meet in the same place," usually for some public purpose, from Old French convenir "to come together; to suit, agree," from Latin convenire "to come together, meet together, assemble; unite, join, combine; agree with, accord; be suitable or proper (to)," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + venire "to come," from a suffixed form of PIE root *gwa- "to go, come."

Transitive sense of "call together, cause to assemble" is from 1590s. Related: Convened; convener; convening.

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front (v.)

1520s, "have the face toward," from French fronter, from Old French front (see front (n.)). Meaning "meet face-to-face" is from 1580s. Meaning "serve as a public facade for" is from 1932. Related: Fronted; fronting.

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mishappen (v.)

"to happen ill, meet with misfortune, come to grief," mid-14c., from mis- (1) + happen. Related: Mishappened; mishappening. The word now is obsolete. Chaucer uses mishappy; mishappiness was in use 16c.-17c.

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tabagie (n.)
1819, from French tabagie (17c.), from tabac "tobacco" (see tobacco) + -age. A group of smokers who meet in club fashion; a "tobacco-parliament." In German, a Rauchkneipe.
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maker (n.)

c. 1300, "one who creates, shapes, forms, or molds," also "God as creator," agent noun from make (v.). Specifically, "manufacturer" by late 14c. To meet (one's) maker "die" is attested by 1814.

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moot (v.)

"to debate, argue for and against" (mid-14c.), from Old English motian "to meet, talk, discuss, argue, plead," from mot "meeting" (see moot (n.)). Meaning "raise or bring forward for discussion" is from 1680s. Related: Mooted; mooting.

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convocate (v.)

"to convoke, call or summon to meet," 1540s, from Latin convocatus, past participle of convocare "to call together," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + vocare "to call," a verbal derivative of vox "voice" (from PIE root *wekw- "to speak").

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converge (v.)

1690s, "to tend to meet in a point or line," from Late Latin convergere "to incline together" from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + vergere "to bend, turn, tend toward" (from PIE root *wer- (2) "to turn, bend"). Related: Converged; converging.

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convoke (v.)

"to call together, summon to meet," 1590s, from French convoquer (14c.), from Latin convocare "to call together," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + vocare "to call," a verbal derivative of vox "voice" (from PIE root *wekw- "to speak"). Related: Convoked; convoking.

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syndrome (n.)
"a number of symptoms occurring together," 1540s, from medical Latin, from Greek syndrome "concurrence of symptoms, concourse of people," from syndromos "place where several roads meet," literally "a running together," from syn- "with" (see syn-) + dromos "a running, course" (see dromedary). Psychological sense is from 1955.
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