Etymology
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objectivity (n.)
1803, from Medieval Latin objectivus, from Latin objectus (see object (n.)) + -ity.
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alabastrine (adj.)
"of or resembling alabaster," 1590s, from Medieval Latin alabastrinus, from alabaster (see alabaster).
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Anglo-Latin (n.)
Medieval Latin as written in England, 1791, from Anglo- + Latin (n.).
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contessa (n.)

"an Italian countess," 1819, from Italian contessa, from Medieval Latin cometissa (see countess).

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femoral (adj.)
1782, from Medieval Latin femoralis, from stem of Latin femur "thigh" (see femur).
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vegetal (adj.)
c. 1400, from Medieval Latin *vegetalis, from Latin vegetare (see vegetable (adj.)).
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thoracic (adj.)
1650s, from stem of thorax + -ic, or else from Medieval Latin thoracicus.
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heretical (adj.)
early 15c., from Old French eretical, heretical and directly from Medieval Latin haereticalis, from haereticus (see heretic).
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chartulary (n.)

"collection of charters," 1570s, from Medieval Latin chartularium, from Latin chartula "a charter, record" (see charter (n.)).

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officiant (n.)

"one who conducts a religious service, one who administers a sacrament," 1836, from noun use of Medieval Latin officiantem (nominative officians) "performing religious services," present participle of officiare "to perform religious services," from Latin officium "a service; an official duty; ceremonial observance" (in Medieval Latin, "church service"); see office.

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