Etymology
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investigable (adj.)
"that may be investigated," c. 1400, from Late Latin investigabilis "that may be searched into," from Latin investigare "trace out, search after," from in- "in, into" (from PIE root *en "in") + vestigare "to track, trace," from vestigium "footprint, track" (see vestige).
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contingency (n.)
Origin and meaning of contingency

1560s, "quality of being contingent, openness to chance or free will, the possibility that that which happens might not have happened," from contingent + abstract noun suffix -cy. Meaning "a chance occurrence, an accident, an event which may or may not occur" is from 1610s.

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superable (adj.)
"surmountable," 1620s, from Latin superabilis "that may be overcome," from superare "to overcome, surmount, go over, rise above," from super "over" (from PIE root *uper "over") + -abilis (see -able). The negative formation insuperable is older and more common and superable may be a back-formation from it.
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deliverable (adj.)

"that may be delivered," 1727, from deliver + -able.

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reachable (adj.)

"that may be reached, capable of being reached," 1690s; see reach (v.) + -able.

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masticable (adj.)

"capable of being chewed, that may be masticated," 1802; see masticate + -able.

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arguably (adv.)
"as may be shown by argument," 1871, from arguable + -ly (2).
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obtainable (adj.)

"procurable, that may be got," 1610s, from obtain + -able. Related: Obtainability.

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passable (adj.)

early 15c., "that may be crossed, traversable," from pass (v.) + -able, or from Old French passable "fordable, affording passage" (14c.). Sense of "tolerable, such as may be allowed to pass" is attested from late 15c. Related: Passably.

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supposedly (adv.)
"as may be supposed, presumably," 1610s, from supposed + -ly (2).
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