Etymology
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hazmat 
also HAZMAT, 1977, telescoped from hazardous material(s).
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materially (adv.)

late 14c., "with, in, by, or with reference to matter or material things," from material (adj.) + -ly (2). Sense of "to an important extent or degree, essentially" is from 1650s.

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deictic (adj.)

in logic, "direct, proving directly" (opposed to elenchic), 1828, from Latinized form of Greek deiktikos "able to show," from deiktos "shown," verbal adjective from deiknynai "to show" (from PIE root *deik- "to show"). Related: Deictical (1630s); deictically.

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materiel (n.)

"the totality of things used in the carrying out of any complex art or technique" (as distinguished from personnel), 1814, from French matériel "material," noun use of adj. matériel (see material (adj.)). A later borrowing of the same word that became material (n.). By 1819 in the specific sense of "articles, supplies, machinery, etc. used in the military."

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ideo- 
word-forming element variously used with reference to images or to ideas, from Greek idea "form; the look of a thing; a kind, sort, nature; mode, fashion," in logic, "a class, kind, sort, species" (see idea).
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concrete (n.)

1520s, "that which is material or not abstract," a noun use of concrete (adj.). Meaning "a mass formed by concretion" is from 1650s, from the literal sense of Latin concretus. Hence "building material made from sand, gravel, stone chips, etc., cemented together" (1834). 

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bordering (n.)

"material for a border of any kind," 1872, verbal noun from border (v.).

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antithesis (n.)

1520s, "opposition, contrast," originally in rhetoric, "the bringing of contrary ideas or terms in close opposition;" 1530s as "that which is in (rhetorical) opposition or contrast," from Late Latin antithesis, from Greek antithesis "opposition, resistance," literally "a placing against," also a term in logic and rhetoric, noun of action from antitithenai "to set against, oppose," a term in logic, from anti "against" (see anti-) + tithenai "to put, place" (from reduplicated form of PIE root *dhe- "to set, put").

The extended sense of "direct or striking opposition" is from 1630s; by 1831 as "that which is the direct opposite."

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causal (adj.)

1530s, in grammar and logic, "expressing a cause," from Latin causalis "relating to a cause," from causa "a cause, reason" (see cause (n.)). From 1560s as "relating to a cause or causes;" 1640s as "being a cause, producing effects."

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methodology (n.)

"branch of logic that shows how abstract logical principles are to be applied to the production of knowledge," 1800, from French méthodologie or directly from Modern Latin methodologia; see method + -ology. Often simply a longer variant of method.

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