Etymology
Advertisement
marshmallow (n.)

Old English mersc-mealwe "kind of mallow plant (Althea officinalis) which grows near salt marshes;" from marsh + mallow. The confection (so called from 1877) originally was made from paste from the mucilaginous roots of this plant. The Greek word for the shrub, althaea, is from althein, althainein "to heal, get well" (the roots were used medicinally), from PIE root *al- (2) "to grow, nourish."

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
marsupial (adj.)

"of or pertaining to the implacental mammals," who usually are provided with a pouch for their young, 1690s, with -al (1) + Modern Latin marsupialis "having a pouch," coined from Late Latin marsupium "pouch, purse" (Classical Latin marsuppium), from Greek marsipion, diminutive of marsipos, marsippos "bag, pouch, purse," a word of foreign or Pre-Greek origin. As a noun, "a marsupial animal, an implacental didelphian mammal," from 1805.

Related entries & more 
salt-marsh (n.)

"salt-water marshland," Old English sealtne mersc; see salt (n.) + marsh

Related entries & more 
Marseilles 

also Marseille, city in southern France, from French Marseille, ultimately from Greek Massilia, which is probably from a pre-Latin language of Italy, perhaps Ligurian mas "spring." Related: Massilian "of or belonging to Marseilles."

Related entries & more 
field-marshal (n.)
high military rank in some European armies, 1610s, from field (n.) + marshal (n.). Compare French maréchal de camp, German Feldmarschall.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
court-marshal (n.)

"one who acts as a marshal at court," 1690s, from court (n.) + marshal (n.).

Related entries & more 
Marsala (n.)

kind of white wine, 1806, named for the seaport town on the west coast of Sicily, in the region where it is produced, the name of which is said to be from Arabic Mirsa-llahi, literally "the Port of God."

Related entries & more 
Marsellaise (n.)

French national republican song, 1826, from fem. of adjective Marseillais "of Marseilles." The tune originally was "War Song for the Rhine Army," composed (for the Strasbourg volunteers) by royalist officer Capt. Claude Joseph Rouget de Lisle (1760-1836); the current name is because it was sung enthusiastically by soldiers from Marseilles advancing on the Tuileries, Aug. 10, 1792. However, during the Revolution, the city was punished for its royalist Sympathies by being stripped of its name and called instead  Ville-sans-Nom "city without a name" (which is, of course, a name).

Related entries & more 
Marshall 

surname, from marshal (n.). The city in Texas, U.S., was named in 1841 for U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Marshall (1755-1835). The Marshall Plan, "U.S. assistance to aid certain Western European nations recovering from World War II," is from 1947, named for its initiator, George C. Marshall (1880-1959), who was U.S. Secretary of State 1947-49. The Marshall Islands in the western Pacific were explored in 1788 by British naval captains John Marshall (1748-1819) and Thomas Gilbert, and named for the former (for the latter, see Kiribati). Related: Marshallese.

Related entries & more 
marshland (n.)

"a marshy district," Old English mersclond; see marsh + land (n.).

Related entries & more 

Page 3