Etymology
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gavage (n.)
"force-feeding of poultry for market," 1889, from French gavage, from gaver "to stuff" (17c.; see gavotte).
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seller (n.)

"merchant, vendor," c. 1200, agent noun from sell (v.). Seller's market, in which demand predominates, is recorded by 1934.

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grazier (n.)
"one who pastures cattle for market," late 13c. as a surname, agent noun from graze (v.1).
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slaughter (v.)
1530s, "butcher an animal for market," from slaughter (n.). Meaning "slay wantonly, ruthlessly, or in great numbers" is from 1580s. Related: Slaughtered; slaughtering.
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drover (n.)

"one who drives cattle or sheep to market," early 15c. (late 13c. as a surname), agent noun from drove (n.).

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bullish (adj.)
1560s, "of the nature of a bull," from bull (n.1) + -ish; stock market sense "tending to advance in price" is from 1882. Related: Bullishly; bullishness.
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buyer (n.)
c. 1200, biggere "one who purchases," agent noun from buy (v.). Meaning "one whose job is to buy goods for a store" is from 1884. Buyer's market attested from 1886.
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stallage (n.)
"tax levied for the privilege of erecting a stall at a market or fair," late 14c. (mid-13c. in Anglo-Latin), from stall (n.1) + -age.
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glut (n.)
1530s, "a gulp, a swallowing," from glut (v.). Meaning "condition of being full or sated" is 1570s; mercantile sense "superabundance, oversupply of a commodity on the market" first recorded 1590s.
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Dushanbe 
capital of Tajikistan, from Tajik dushanbe "Monday" (a compound of du "two" + Shanbe "Saturday," literally "Sabbath;" thus "two days after Saturday"); so called in reference to a regular Monday market there. Known from 1929-1961 as Stalinabad.
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