Etymology
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transplant (v.)

mid-15c., from Late Latin transplantare "plant again in a different place," from Latin trans "across, beyond" (see trans-) + plantare "to plant" (see plant (n.)). Extended to people (1550s) and then to organs or tissue (1786). Related: Transplanted; transplanting. An earlier verb was overplaunten "to transplant" (a tree), late 14c.

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-phyte 

word-forming element meaning "plant, plant characteristic; planting, growth; abnormal growth," from Greek phyton "plant," literally "that which has grown," from phyein "to bring forth, make grow," from PIE root *bheue- "to be, exist, grow."

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cross-pollination (n.)

"transfer of pollen from the male reproductive organ of one plant to the female reproductive organ of another plant," 1880, from cross- + pollination.

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aerophyte (n.)

"plant which lives exclusively on air," 1838, perhaps via French aerophyte, from aero- "air" + -phyte "plant."

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manufacture (v.)

1680s, "convert material to a form suitable for use," from manufacture (n.). Meaning "to make or fabricate," especially in considerable quantities or numbers, as by the aid of many hands or machinery" is by 1755. Figurative sense of "produce artificially, invent fictitiously, get up by contrivance or effort" is from 1762. Related: Manufactured; manufacturing; manufacturable.

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narcissus (n.)

type of bulbous flowering plant, 1540s, from Latin narcissus, from Greek narkissos, a plant name, not the modern narcissus, possibly a type of iris or lily, associated with Greek narkē "numbness" (see narcotic (n.)) because of the sedative effect of the alkaloids in the plant, but Beekes considers this folk-etymology and writes that "The suffix clearly points to a Pre-Greek word."

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xerophyte (n.)

1897, from xero- + Greek phyton "a plant" (see phyto-).

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wort (n.)

"a plant," Old English wyrt "root, herb, vegetable, plant, spice," from Proto-Germanic *wurtiz (source also of Old Saxon wurt, Old Norse, Danish urt, Old High German wurz "plant, herb," German Wurz, Gothic waurts, Old Norse rot "root"), from PIE root *wrād- "branch, root." St. John's wort attested from 15c.

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herbivorous (adj.)

"plant-eating," 1660s, from Modern Latin herbivorus, from Latin herba "a plant" (see herb) + vorare "devour, swallow" (from PIE root *gwora- "food, devouring").

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beet-root (n.)

"the root of the beet plant," 1570s, from beet (n.) + root (n.).

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