Etymology
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man-like (adj.)

also manlike, mid-15c., "masculine, manly, having qualities proper or becoming to a man," from man (n.) + like (adj.). Meaning "resembling man in form or nature" is from 1580s.

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merry man (n.)

"companion in arms, follower of a knight, outlaw, etc.," late 14c., from merry (adj.) + man (n.). Related: Merry men.

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man-stealer (n.)

also manstealer, "one who kidnaps human beings to sell into slavery," 1580s, from man (n. ) + agent noun from steal (v.).

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G-man (n.)
"FBI agent," 1930, shortening of government man; used earlier in an Irish context (1917), but the abbreviation is perhaps the same one.
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he-man (n.)
"especially masculine fellow," 1832, originally among U.S. pioneers, from he + man (n.).
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man-hater (n.)

"misanthrope," 1570s, from man (n.) + hater. Old English had mannhata "man-hater." Often in old use of Timon of Athens. Meaning "a woman who hates the male sex" is by 1839.

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wild man (n.)
c. 1200, "man lacking in self-restraint," from wild (adj.) + man (n.). From mid-13c. as "primitive, savage." Late 14c. as a surname.
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foe-man (n.)
also foeman, "active enemy," late Old English fah-man; see foe + man (n.).
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man-killer (n.)

also mankiller, "murderer, homicide," early 15c., from man (n.) + killer. Old English words for this were manslaga, manslieht, and earlier in Middle English was man-queller (mid-13c., also "official executioner"). Middle English had also man-qualm "mass death among people (from plague, etc.), slaughter" (see qualm).

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ditty bag (n.)

"small bag used by sailors for needles, thread, scissors, thimble, etc.," 1828, nautical slang, of uncertain origin, perhaps from the alleged British naval phrase commodity bag. Hence also ditty-box (1841).

Every true man-of-war's man knows how to cut out clothing with as much ease, and producing as correct a fit, as the best tailor. This is a necessity on board ship, for the ready-made clothing procured of the purser is never known to fit, being generally manufactured several sizes larger than necessary, in order that it may be re-cut and made in good style. [Charles Nordhoff, "The Young Man-of-War's Man," 1866]
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