Etymology
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soused (adj.)

"drunk," 1610s, from past participle of souse (v.), on notion of one "pickled" in liquor.

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guzzle (n.)

1590s, "a drain," from guzzle (v.). From 1704 as "liquor," 1836 as "bout of heavy drinking."

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snootful (n.)

"as much (liquor) as one can take," 1885, from snoot (n.) + -ful.

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sneaky (adj.)

1833, from sneak (v.) + -y (2). Related: Sneakily; sneakiness. Sneaky Pete "cheap liquor" is from 1949.

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mash (n.)

"soft mixture, mass of ingredients beaten or stirred together," late Old English *masc (in masc-wyrt "mash-wort, infused malt"), from Proto-Germanic *maisk- (source also of Swedish mäsk "grains for pigs," German Maisch "crushed grapes, infused malt," Old English meox "dung, filth"), possibly from PIE root *meik- "to mix."

Originally a word in brewing; general sense of "anything reduced to a soft pulpy consistency" is recorded from 1590s, as is the figurative sense "confused mixture, muddle." Short for mashed potatoes it is attested from 1904.

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rotgut (n.)

also rot-gut, "unwholesome liquor; cheap, adulterated whiskey," 1630s, from rot (v.) + gut (n.).

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bootleg (n.)

also boot-leg, "upper part of the leg of a boot," 1630s, from boot (n.1) + leg (n.). As an adjective in reference to illegal liquor, 1889, American English slang, from the trick of concealing a flask of liquor down the leg of a high boot. Before that the bootleg was the place to secret knives and pistols. Extended to unauthorized music recordings, etc., by 1957.

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brown-bag (v.)

"to bring lunch or liquor in a brown paper bag," 1970, from brown (adj.) + bag (n.). Related: Brown-bagging.

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taffy (n.)

coarse candy made from sugar or molasses boiled down and cooled, 1817, related to toffee, but of uncertain origin; perhaps associated with tafia (1763), a rum-like alcoholic liquor distilled from molasses, presumably of West Indian or Malay (Austronesian) origin (perhaps a Creole shortening of ratafia). On this theory, the candy would have been made from the syrup skimmed off the liquor during distillation.

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firewater (n.)

also fire-water, "alcoholic liquor," 1826, American English, supposedly from speech of American Indians, from fire (n.) + water (n.1).

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