Etymology
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androgen (n.)
"male sex hormone," 1936, from andro- "man, male" + -gen "thing that produces or causes."
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yang (n.)
masculine or positive principle in Chinese philosophy, 1670s, from Mandarin yang, said to mean "male, daylight, solar," or "sun, positive, male genitals."
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DOS 

"computer operating system using a disk storage device," 1967, acronym of disk operating system.

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mallard (n.)

c. 1300, "wild drake or duck," from Old French malart (12c.) or Medieval Latin mallardus, apparently from male, from Latin masculus (see male), in which case the original sense probably was not of a specific species but of any male wild duck, though the specific sense of "male of the wild duck" is not attested in English until early 14c.

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androphobia (n.)
"morbid fear of the male sex" (sometimes, rather, "of the human race" or "of crowds"), 1844, from andro- "man, male" + -phobia. Related: Androphobic.
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cookee (n.)

"male assistant to a (male) cook in a lumber camp, etc.," 1846, American English, from cook (n.) + diminutive ending.

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machismo (n.)

"male virility, masculine pride," 1940, from American Spanish machismo, from Spanish macho "male" (see macho) + ismo (see -ism).

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castrato (n.)

"male person emasculated during childhood to prevent the change of voice at puberty, artificial male soprano," 1763, from Italian castrato, from Latin castratus (see castration). "The voice of such a person, after arriving at adult age, combines the high range and sweetness of the female with the power of the male voice" [Century Dictionary].

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systematize (v.)
"make into a system," 1764, from French systématiser or a native formation from system (Greek stem systemat-) + -ize. Related: Systematized; systematizing.
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Rom 

"male Gypsy," 1841, see Romany.

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