Etymology
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impure (adj.)

mid-15c., of wine, "muddy, not clear," from Old French impur (13c.), from Latin impurus "not pure, unclean, filthy, foul," from assimilated form of in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + purus "pure" (see pure).

In English, the subsequent order of sense appearance seems to be "earthly, mundane, not spiritual" (c. 1500); "obscene, lewd, unchaste, immoral" (1530s); "mixed with offensive matter, tainted" (1590s); "mixed or combined with other things" (without reference to foulness), 1620s. As a noun from 1784. Related: Impurely.

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pureness (n.)

late 14c., purenes, purenesse, "freedom from admixture or defilement; spiritual or moral purity," from pure (adj.) + -ness.

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collin (n.)

pure form of gelatin, 1848, from Greek kolla "glue," which is of uncertain origin, + chemical suffix -in (2).

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rock-candy (n.)

"hard confection made of pure sugar in crystals of considerable size," 1723, from rock (n.1) + candy (n.).

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underbred (adj.)
"of inferior breeding, vulgar," 1640s, from under + past participle of breed (v.). Of animals, "not pure bred," attested from 1890.
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cleanly (adj.)
Old English clænlic "morally pure, innocent," from clæne (see clean (adj.)). Of persons, "habitually clean," from c. 1500.
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purity (n.)

c. 1200, purite, "freedom from moral contamination, sinlessness, innocence; righteousness; chastity," from Old French purete "simple truth," earlier purte (12c., Modern French pureté), from Late Latin puritatem (nominative puritas) "cleanness, pureness," from Latin purus "clean, pure, unmixed; chaste, undefiled" (see pure (adj.)). From mid-15c. as "freedom from admixture or adulteration."

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Latinity (n.)
1610s, "pure Latin style," from Latin latinitas, from Latinus (see Latin (adj.)). From 1880 as "the civil rights of ancient Latins."
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insincerity (n.)
1540s, from in- (1) "not, opposite of" + sincerity, or else from Latin insincerus "not genuine, not pure; spoiled, corrupted" (see insincere).
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purely (adv.)

c. 1300, pureli, "wholly, fully, completely; actually, really, truly," from pure + -ly (2). Sense of "without physical admixture" is from c. 1500.

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