Etymology
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centrifuge (n.)

1887, "a centrifuge machine," originally a machine for separating cream from milk, from French centrifuge, from noun use of adjective meaning "centrifugal" (1801), from Modern Latin centrifugus (see centrifugal). Centrifuge machine is from 1765.

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calculating (n.)
1710, "calculation," verbal noun from calculate (v.). Calculating-machine "mechanical computer, machine which performs mathematical calculations" is from 1830 [Babbage].
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calender (n.)
"machine consisting of close-set revolving cylinders or rolls which smooths and presses paper, cloth, etc.," 1510s (late 13c. in calenderer, surname of persons who use such a machine), from Old French calandreur, from Medieval Latin calendra "cloth-pressing machine," so called from the shape of the machine used, from Latin cylindrus, from Greek kylindros "roll, cylinder" (see cylinder).
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calender (v.)

"to pass through a calender," a machine which smooths and presses paper, cloth, etc., 1510s, from French calandre, the machine name, from Medieval Latin calendra (see calender (n.)).

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debug (v.)

"remove the faults from," 1945, of machine systems, from de- + bug (n.) "glitch, defect in a machine." Meaning "to remove a concealed microphone" is from 1964. Related: Debugged; debugging.

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input (n.)
1753, "a sum (of cash) put in, a sharing, contribution," from verbal phrase; see in (adv.) + put (v.). Meaning "energy supplied to a device or machine" is from 1902, later of electronic devices; computing sense of "data fed into a machine" is from 1948, though this is perhaps from the verb in the computing sense.
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baler (n.)
machine that makes bales, 1888, agent noun from bale (v.).
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tappet (n.)
machine part, 1745, apparently from tap (v.1) + -et, "but the use of the suffix is abnormal" [OED].
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impeller (n.)
1680s, agent noun from impel (v.). As a machine part from 1836.
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