Etymology
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abeam (adv.)

"at right angles to the keel" of a ship, hence in line with its beam, 1826, nautical, literally "on beam;" see a- (1) + beam (n.) in the nautical sense.

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summer (n.2)

"horizontal bearing beam," late 13c., from Anglo-French sumer, Old French somier "main beam," originally "pack horse," from Vulgar Latin *saumarius, from Late Latin sagmarius "pack horse," from sagma "packsaddle" (see sumpter).

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sill (n.)

Middle English sille, from Old English syll "beam, threshold, large timber serving as a foundation of a wall," from Proto-Germanic *suljo (source also of Old Norse svill, Swedish syll, Danish syld "framework of a building," Middle Low German sull, Old High German swelli, German Schwelle "sill"), perhaps from PIE root *swel- (3) "post, board" (source also of Greek selma "beam").

The meaning "lower horizontal part of a window opening" is recorded from early 15c.; extended to the lower part of the case or frame of a door by 1590s. Used in geology in reference to certain types of rock beds or layers from 1794.

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radiate (adj.)

"having rays, furnished with rays or ray-like parts, shining," 1660s, from Latin radiatus, past participle of radiare "to beam, shine, gleam; make beaming," from radius "beam of light; spoke of a wheel" (see radius).

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moonbeam (n.)

"ray of light from the moon," 1580s, from moon (n.) + beam (n.).

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boom (n.1)

"long pole," 1640s, specifically, "long spar run out from a ship" (1660s), from Scottish boun, borrowed from Dutch boom "tree, pole, beam," from a Middle Dutch word analogous to German Baum, English beam (n.). As "movable bar for a microphone or camera," 1931.

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quickbeam (n.)

Old English cwic-beam, a name of some tree, from beam (n.), in its original sense of "tree," apparently with quick (adj.), though "the precise force of the adj. is not clear" [OED]. The aspen, old world mountain ash, and rowan have been proposed as the tree in question.

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rafter (n.1)

"sloping timber of a roof," c. 1200, from Old English ræftras (West Saxon), reftras (Mercian), both plural, "a beam, pole, rafter of a building," related to Old Norse raptr "log," from Proto-Germanic *raf-tra-, from PIE *rap-tro-, from root *rep- "stake, beam."

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sunbeam (n.)

Old English sunnebeam; see sun (n.) + beam (n.). As "cheerful person" from 1886.

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windlass (n.)

device for raising weights by winding a rope round a cylinder, c. 1400, alteration of wyndase (late 13c.), from Anglo-French windas, and directly from a Scandinavian source such as Old Norse vindass, from vinda "to wind" (see wind (v.1)) + ass "pole, beam" (cognate with Gothic ans "beam, pillar").

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