Etymology
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luv 
affectionate, dialectal, or colloquial spelling of love (noun and verb), attested from 1825.
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loved (adj.)

c. 1300, past-participle adjective from love (v.). Loved ones "friends and relations" (especially those deceased) is by 1793, earlier often beloved ones.

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lovable (adj.)
also loveable, mid-14c., from love (v.) + -able. Related: Lovably.
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lovesome (adj.)
Old English lufsum "worthy of love," from love (n.) + -some (1). Early 13c. as "lovely," 1720 as "amorous." An old word that yet might be useful in its original sense. Related: Lovesomely; lovesomeness.
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loving (adj.)
"affectionate," early 14c. (Old English had lufende "affectionate"), verbal noun from love (v.). Loving-cup, made for several to drink from, is attested from 1808. Loving-kindness was Coverdale's word to describe God's love (Psalms lxxxix.33).
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beloved (adj.)
late 14c., past-participle adjective from obsolete verb belove "to please; be pleased with" (c. 1200), from be- + loven "to love" (see love (v.)). Noun meaning "one who is beloved" is from 1520s, first in Biblical language.
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love-bird (n.)

also lovebird, 1590s, small species of West African parrot, noted for the remarkable attention mating pairs pay to one another; figurative sense of "a lover" is attested from 1911.

Hold hands, you lovebirds. [Emil Sitka]
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love-apple (n.)

old name for "tomato," 1570s, translating French pomme d'amour, corresponding to German Liebesapfel, etc., but the alleged aphrodisiac qualities that supposedly inspired the name seem far-fetched. The phrase also has been explained as a mangled transliteration of the Italian name pomo d'oro (by 1560s), taken as from adorare "to adore," but probably rather from d'or "of gold" (the earliest tomatoes brought to Italy in the mid-1500s apparently were of the yellow or orange variety), or, less likely, pomo de'Mori or Spanish pome dei Moro, literally "Moorish apple."

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lovely (adj.)
Old English luflic "affectionate, loving; loveable;" see love (n.) + -ly (1). Sense of "lovable on account of beauty, attractive" is from c. 1300; in modern use "applied indiscriminately to all pleasing material objects, from a piece of plum-cake to a Gothic cathedral" [George P. Marsh, "The Origin and History of the English Language," 1862]. As an expression of delight, 1610s.
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unloved (adj.)

late 14c., from un- (1) "not" + past participle of love (v.). A verb, unlove (with un- (2)) is attested from late 14c. Old English unlofod meant "unpraised."

He that can love unloved again,
Hath better store of love than brain
[Robert Ayton (1570-1638)]
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