Etymology
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self-love (n.)

"the instinct or virtue which directs a person's actions to the promotion of his own welfare," 1560s; see self- + love (n.). In early use especially "love of oneself, particularity to oneself."

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hickey (n.)

"any small gadget," 1909, American English, of unknown origin. For the "love-bite" sense, see hickie.

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morsel (n.)

late 13c., "a bite, mouthful; small piece of food, fragment," from Old French morsel (Modern French morceau) "small bite, portion, helping," diminutive of mors "a bite," from Latin morsum, neuter of morsus  "biting, a bite," past participle of mordēre "to bite," which is perhaps from an extended form of PIE root *mer- "to rub away, harm."

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hickie (n.)

"love bite; mark on skin made by biting or sucking during foreplay or sex," 1934; earlier "pimple, skin lesion" (c. 1915); perhaps a sense extension and spelling variation from the earlier word meaning "small gadget, device; any unspecified object" (1909, see hickey and compare doohickey, still used in this sense).

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loving (n.)

"love, friendship," also "sexual love," late 14c., verbal noun from love (v.).

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amatory (adj.)

1590s, "pertaining to love, expressive of love" (especially sexual love), from Latin amatorius "loving, amorous," from amat-, past-participle stem of amare "to love" (see Amy). Related: Amatorial.

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amorous (adj.)

c. 1300, "in love; inclined to love; sexually attracted," from Old French amoros "loving, in love; lovely" (13c., Modern French amoureux), from Late Latin amorosum, from Latin amor "love, affection, strong friendly feeling; one's beloved," from amare "to love, be in love with; find pleasure in" (see Amy). Related: Amorously; amorousness.

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