Etymology
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jinglet (n.)
"loose metal ball serving as the clapper of a sleigh-bell," 1875, diminutive of jingle (n.).
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Hippolytus 
masc. proper name, son of Theseus in Greek mythology, from Greek Hippolytos, literally "letting horses loose," from hippos "horse" (from PIE root *ekwo- "horse") + stem of lyein "to unfasten, loose, loosen, untie" (from PIE root *leu- "to loosen, divide, cut apart").
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-lytic 
word-forming element used in making adjectives corresponding to nouns in -lysis, from Greek -lytikos, from lytikos "able to loose, loosing," from lytos "loosed," verbal adjective of lyein "to unfasten, loose, loosen, untie" (from PIE root *leu- "to loosen, divide, cut apart").
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fag (n.1)
British slang for "cigarette" (originally, especially, the butt of a smoked cigarette), 1888, probably from fag "loose piece, last remnant of cloth" (late 14c., as in fag-end "extreme end, loose piece," 1610s), which perhaps is related to fag (v.), which could make it a variant of flag (v.).
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relax (v.)

late 14c., relaxen, "to make (something) less compact or dense" (transitive), originally especially in medicine, of muscles, etc., from Old French relaschier "set free; soften; reduce" (14c.) and directly from Latin relaxare "relax, loosen, open, stretch out, widen again; make loose," from re- "back" (see re-) + laxare "loosen," from laxus "loose" (from PIE root *sleg- "be slack, be languid"). A doublet of release.

Meaning "decrease tension" is from early 15c. From 1660s as "to make less severe or rigorous." Intransitive sense of "become loose or languid" is by 1762; that of "become less tense" is recorded from 1935. Of persons, "to become less formal," by 1837. Related: Relaxed; relaxing. As a noun, "relaxation, an act of relaxing," from 17c.

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extrication (n.)

"act of extricating, state of being extricated; disentanglement; act or process of setting loose or free," 1640s, noun of action from extricate (v.).

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paper-weight (n.)

"small, heavy object used to hold down loose papers," by 1832, from paper (n.) + weight (n.).

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sloppy (adj.)
1727, "muddy," from slop (n.1) + -y (2). Meaning "loose, ill-fitting, slovenly" is first recorded 1825, influenced by slop (n.2). Related: Sloppily; sloppiness. Sloppy Joe was originally "loose-fitting sweater worn by girls" (1942); as a name for a kind of spiced hamburger, it is attested from 1961.
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nightgown (n.)

also night-gown, "loose gown for putting on at night," c. 1400, from night + gown.

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