Etymology
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self-discipline (n.)

"ability to restrain or guide or control oneself," 1690s; see self- + discipline (n.). Related: Self-disciplined.

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self-confidence (n.)

"confidence of one's own judgment or ability, reliance on one's own powers without other aid," 1650s, a back-formation from self-confident, or else from self- + confidence.

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self-concept (n.)

also self concept, in psychology, "a person's idea of himself," 1921, from self + concept.

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self-educated (adj.)

"educated by one's own efforts alone, without regular training," 1761, from self- + educated.

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self-regulating (adj.)

"regulating itself," 1837, from self- + present participle of regulate (v.). Related: Self-regulated; self-regulation.

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self-taught (adj.)

"self-taught; educated by one's own efforts alone, without regular training," 1725; see self- + taught.

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self-abuse (n.)

c. 1600, "self-deception, abuse of one's own person or powers," from self- + abuse (n.). As a synonym for "masturbation," it is recorded from 1728; an earlier term was self-pollution (1620s).

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self-actualization (n.)

"realization or fulfillment of oneself," 1939, from self- + actualization. Popularized, though not coined, by U.S. psychologist and philosopher Abraham H. Maslow.

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self-centered (adj.)

1670s, "fixed, stationary," from self- + center (v.). In reference to persons, "engrossed in the self, with little regard for others," it is recorded from 1783.

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self-important (adj.)

"having or showing an exaggerated estimation of one's own importance, pompously egotistical," 1728, from self- + important. Related: Self-importance (1728); self-importantly.

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