Etymology
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introspect (v.)
1680s, "to look into" (transitive), from Latin introspectus, past participle of introspicere "look at, look into; examine, observe attentively," from intro- "inward" (see intro-) + specere "to look at" (from PIE root *spek- "to observe"). Meaning "look within, search one's feelings or thoughts" is from 1875, a back-formation from introspection. Related: Introspected; introspecting.
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unlooked (adj.)
c. 1300, "neglected," from un- (1) "not" + past participle of look (v.). With for, "unexpected," attested from 1530s.
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lo (interj.)

early 13c., from Old English la, exclamation of surprise, grief, joy, or mere greeting; probably merged with or influenced in Middle English by lo!, which is perhaps short for lok "look!" imperative of loken "to look" (see look (v.)). Expression lo and behold attested by 1779. In old U.S. slang, Lo was a generic name for an Indian or the Indians collectively (1871), from jocular use of Pope's line "Lo, the poor Indian" ["Essay on Man"].

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outlook (n.)

"mental view or survey," 1742, from out- + look (v.). The meaning "prospect for the future" is attested from 1851. Earliest sense was "a place from which an observer looks out or watches anything" (1660s). The literal sense of "vigilant watch, act or practice of looking out" (1815) is rare; look-out being used instead for this.

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inspect (v.)
1620s, from Latin inspectus, past participle of inspicere "look at, observe, view; look into, inspect, examine," from in- "into" (from PIE root *en "in") + specere "to look" (from PIE root *spek- "to observe"). Related: Inspected; inspecting.
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prospect (v.)

"explore for gold or other minerals, examine land with a view to a mining claim," 1841, from prospect (n.) in specialized sense of "spot giving prospects of ore" (1832). Earlier in a now-obsolete sense of "look forth, look out over" (1550s), from Latin prospectare, frequentative of prospicere. Related: Prospected; prospecting.

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waxwing (n.)
1817, from wax (n.) + wing (n.). So called for appendages at the tips of its feathers which look like red sealing-wax.
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-scope 
word-forming element indicating "an instrument for seeing," from Late Latin -scopium, from Greek -skopion, from skopein "to look at, examine" (from PIE root *spek- "to observe").
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prospective (adj.)

1580s, "characterized by looking to the future," from obsolete French prospectif and directly from Medieval Latin prospectivus "affording a prospect; pertaining to a prospect," from Latin prospect-, past-participle stem of prospicere "look out on, look forward," from pro "forward" (see pro-) + specere "look at" (from PIE root *spek- "to observe"). The sense of "being in prospect or expectation, looked forward to" is by 1829.

Also used as a noun in various senses: "outlook, prospect, view" (1590s); "spy glass, telescope" (17c.), from the adjectival sense of "suitable for viewing at a distance" (c. 1600). Related: Prospectively.

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aspect (n.)
Origin and meaning of aspect
late 14c., an astrological term, "relative position of the planets as they appear from earth" (i.e., how they "look at" one another); also "one of the ways of viewing something," from Latin aspectus "a seeing, looking at, sight, view; countenance; appearance," from past participle of aspicere "to look at, look upon, behold; observe, examine," figuratively "consider, ponder," from ad "to" (see ad-) + specere "to look" (from PIE root *spek- "to observe"). Meanings "the look one wears; the appearance of things" are attested by early 15c. Sense of "a facing in a given direction" is from 1660s.
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