Etymology
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full-time (adj.)
also fulltime, 1895; full-timer is attested from 1855, in reference to students; see full (adj.) + time (n.).
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time-keeper (n.)
also timekeeper, 1680s, from time (n.) + keeper.
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two-time (v.)
"to deceive, cheat, betray," 1924, perhaps from notion of "to have two at a time." An earlier reference (1922) in a Kentucky criminal case involves a double-cross or betrayal without a romance angle. Related: two-timing (adj.); two-timer.
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night-time (n.)

also nighttime, "the hours of darkness," late 13c., from night + time (n.). In the same sense Middle English also had nighter-tale (c. 1300), probably based on Old Norse nattar-þel.

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half-time (n.)
also halftime, half time, indicating "half of the time," 1640s, from half + time (n.). Tempo sense is by 1880. In football, from 1867.
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all-time (adj.)
"during recorded time," 1910, American English, from all + time (n.). Earlier it had been used in a sense "full-time," of employment, or in opposition to one-time (1883). Middle English had al-time (adv.) "at all times, always; all the time" (c. 1400).
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old-time (adj.)

"of long standing; having the characteristics of former times," 1824, from old + time (n.). Related: Old-timey (1850). Old times "olden days" is from late 14c. Colloquial old-timer "one who has long occupied a given place or condition; one who retains the views and customs of former times" is by 1860.

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war-time (n.)
late 14c., from war (n.) + time (n.).
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long-suffering (adj.)
also longsuffering, "bearing wrongs without retaliating," 1530s, from long (adj.) + suffering (n.). Old English had langmodig in this sense. From 1520s as a noun, "patience under offense."
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long pig (n.)

"human being eaten as food," by 1848, in stories from the Fiji Islands, said to be a literal rendering of a local term, in one version puaka balava.

Bau literally stank for many days, human flesh having been cooked in every house, and the entrails thrown outside as food for pigs, or left to putrefy in the sun. The Somosomo people were fed with human flesh during their stay at Bau, they being on a visit at that time; and some of the Chiefs of other towns, when bringing their food, carried a cooked human being on one shoulder, and a pig on the other; but they always preferred the "long pig," as they call a man when baked. ["FEEJEE.—Extract of a Letter from the Rev. John Watsford, dated Ono, October 6th, 1846." in "Wesleyan Missionary Notices," Sept. 1847]
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