Etymology
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before vowels log-, word-forming element meaning "speech, word," also "reason," from Greek logos "word, discourse; reason," from PIE root *leg- (1) "to collect, gather," with derivatives meaning "to speak (to 'pick out words')."
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Logos (n.)

1580s, "the divine Word, second person of the Christian Trinity," from Greek logos "word, speech, statement, discourse," also "computation, account," also "reason," from PIE *log-o-, suffixed form of root *leg- (1) "to collect, gather," with derivatives meaning "to speak," on notion of "to pick out words." The Greek word was used by Neo-Platonists in metaphysical and theological senses involving notions of both "reason" and "word" and subsequently picked up by New Testament writers.

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-logy 

word-forming element meaning "a speaking, discourse, treatise, doctrine, theory, science," from Greek -logia (often via French -logie or Medieval Latin -logia), from -log-, combining form of legein "to speak, tell;" thus, "the character or deportment of one who speaks or treats of (a certain subject);" from PIE root *leg- (1) "to collect, gather," with derivatives meaning "to speak (to 'pick out words')." Often via Medieval Latin -logia, French -logie. In philology "love of learning; love of words or discourse," apology, doxology, analogy, trilogy, etc., Greek logos "word, speech, statement, discourse" is directly concerned.

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pit-saw (n.)

"large saw used for cutting timber, operated by two men, one (the pit-sawyer) standing in the pit below the log that is being sawed, the other (the top-sawyer) standing on the log," 1670s, from pit (n.) + saw (n.1).

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stipe (n.)
"stalk of a plant," 1785, from French stipe, from Latin stipes "log, post, tree trunk" (see stiff (adj.)).
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knub (n.)
"small lump, butt-end or piece," 1560s, probably cognate with Low German knubbe "knot, knob," Danish knub "block, log, stump" (see knob).
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catamaran (n.)

East Indies log raft, 1670s, from Hindi or Malayalam, from Tamil (Dravidian) kattu-maram "tied wood," from kattu "tie, binding" + maram "wood, tree." It also was used in the West Indies and South America.

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trumeau (n.)
1883, in architecture, "piece of a wall between two openings," as the central pillar of a great doorway," from French trumeau, literally "calf of the leg" (12c.), from a Germanic source (compare German Trumm "end, stump," Swedish dialectal tromm "stump, end of a log").
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chock (n.)

1670s, "piece of wood, block" (especially one used to prevent movement), possibly from Old North French choque "a block" (Old French çoche "log," 12c.; Modern French souche "stump, stock, block"), from Gaulish *tsukka "a tree trunk, stump."

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bump (n.)
1590s, "protuberance caused by a blow;" 1610s as "a dull-sounding, solid blow;" see bump (v.). The dancer's bump and grind attested from 1940. To be like a bump on a log "silent, stupidly inarticulate" is by 1863, American English.
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