Etymology
Advertisement
unlock (v.)
c. 1400, from un- (2) "reverse, opposite of" + lock (v.). Figurative sense is attested from 1530s. Old English had unlucan "to unlock, open." Related: Unlocked; unlocking.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
locker (n.)
"small chest that can be locked," late 14c., agent noun from Middle English lokken (see lock (v.)). Especially for individual use in companies of men, as on shipboard or in military regiments. As a characteristic of high school life, 20c. Earlier the word meant "a mechanism for locking" (early 14c.).
Related entries & more 
deadlock (n.)

1779, "complete standstill," from dead (adj.), in its emphatic use, + lock (n.1). First attested in Sheridan's play "The Critic." By 1808 as "type of lock worked on one side by a handle and the other by a key." Deadbolt as a type of lock also is from 1808.

Related entries & more 
matchlock (n.)

earliest form of the musket-lock, fired by means of a match in the form of a cord (called a match-cord), 1690s, from match (n.1), in reference to the firing mechanism, + lock (n.1) in the firearm sense (1540s). They were superseded by flint-locks toward the end of 17c.

Related entries & more 
locket (n.)
mid-14c., "iron cross-bar of a window," from Old French loquet "door-handle, bolt, latch, fastening" (14c.), diminutive of loc "lock, latch," from Frankish or some other Germanic source (compare Old Norse lok "fastening, lock;" see lock (n.1)). Meaning "little ornamental case with hinged cover" (containing a lock of hair, miniature portrait, etc.) first recorded 1670s. Italian lucchetto also is from Germanic.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
lockout (n.)
also lock-out, "act of excluding from a place by locking it up," especially of management locking out workers in labor disputes (1854) but also in 19c. the exclusion of a teacher from the schoolhouse by his pupils as an act of protest. From the verbal phrase lock (someone) out, which is attested from mid-14c. in the sense "turn or keep out (of a place), bar the doors against" (see lock (v.) + out (adv.)).
Related entries & more 
forelock (n.)

"lock of hair growing above the forehead," Old English forelocca "forelock;" see fore- + lock (n.2).

"Opportunity has hair in front, behind she is bald; if you seize her by the forelock, you may hold her; but, if she once escapes, not Jupiter himself can catch her again." ["Dictionary of Latin Quotations, Proverbs, Maxims and Mottos," H.T. Riley, London, 1866]
Related entries & more 
wedlock (n.)
Old English wedlac "pledge-giving, marriage vow," from wed + -lac, noun suffix meaning "actions or proceedings, practice," attested in about a dozen Old English compounds (feohtlac "warfare"), but this is the only surviving example. Suffix altered by folk etymology through association with lock (n.1). Meaning "condition of being married" is recorded from early 13c.
Related entries & more 
dreadlocks (n.)

"rope-like strands of hair formed by matting or braiding," 1960, from dread (adj.) + locks (see lock (n.2)). The style is said to be based on that of East African warriors. So called from the dread they presumably aroused in beholders, but Rastafarian dread (1974) also has a sense of "fear of the Lord," expressed in part as alienation from contemporary society.

Related entries & more 
Goldilocks (n.)
name for a person with bright yellow hair, 1540s, from goldy (adj.) "of a golden color" (mid-15c., from gold (n.)) + plural of lock (n.2). The story of the Three Bears first was printed in Robert Southey's miscellany "The Doctor" (1837), but the central figure there was a bad-tempered old woman. Southey did not claim to have invented the story, and older versions have been traced, either involving an old woman or a "silver-haired" girl (though in at least one version it is a fox who enters the house). The identification of the girl as Goldilocks is attested from c. 1875. Goldylocks also is attested from 1570s as a name for the buttercup.
Related entries & more 

Page 3